Advertisement

Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments

, Volume 95, Issue 3, pp 271–284 | Cite as

Aliveri revisited, a biogeographical appraisal of the early Miocene mammals from the eastern Mediterranean

  • Lars W. van den Hoek OstendeEmail author
  • Serdar Mayda
  • Adriana Oliver
  • Anneke Madern
  • Veronica Hernández-Ballarín
  • Pablo Peláez-Campomanes
Original Paper

Abstract

At the time of its discovery, over 25 years ago, the Greek locality of Aliveri preserved the easternmost occurrence for the early Miocene of cricetodontine hamsters such as Cricetodon, Megacricetodon and Democricetodon. As knowledge on the early Miocene history of the eastern Mediterranean increased, the faunal composition became more enigmatic, because of the presence of typical European elements (Pseudotheridomys, Heterosorex, Plesiodimylus, Myxomygale), absent from Anatolia. Recently, the ungulates from the locality were rediscovered, expanding the faunal list with the equid Anchitherium and the pecorans Lagomeryx (two species), Eotragus and Palaeomerycidae gen. et sp. indet. In this paper, we examine the fauna of Aliveri in the light of the current state of knowledge. The assemblage is typical for MN 4, but is believed to pre-date European localities of that biochronological unit. Similarity with Anatolian MN 3 localities suggests that the origin of the fauna lies mostly in that region, whereas the major differences with European localities suggest relative isolation, in line with palaeogeographic reconstructions of the period. However, when isolation was lifted, a number of European elements were added to the local fauna, but, presumably because of an ecological barrier, did not move further into Anatolia. Migrations at the onset of MN 4 can explain the composition of the Greek fauna, but we are still far from completely understanding the complex history of the eastern Mediterranean during the early Miocene.

Keywords

Biogeography Migrations Palaeoenvironments Greece Centre of origin 

Notes

Acknowledgements

With the greatest pleasure, we dedicate this paper to Albert van der Meulen. Albert taught his students to look for the greater picture, and to find new ways reconstruct the history of our planet using fossils. As his students and his students’ students, we hope this contribution is true to his legacy. At the same time, we acknowledge that the current paper would not have been possible without the research on the eastern Mediterrenean early Miocene by Albert’s life-long colleague Hans de Bruijn. The first analyses leading to the paper were carried out by Melenia Kaniadaki, Merel van Haren, Lucas van Duijn and Jorik van der Pas as a mini-project at Leiden University. S.M. was supported by international bilateral research of TUBITAK-RFBR 111Y192 during his visits to the Staatliche Museum für Naturkunde, Stuttgart. We are greatly indebted to Reinhard Ziegler (Stuttgart) for his help in retrieving the Aliveri ungulates. This research was supported by the Spanish MINECO Project No. CGL2011-28877 and the research group UCM 910607. The work of A.O. was supported by a FPU Predoctoral Fellowship and a SYNTHESYS grant at NL-TAF, and the work of .H.-B. by a FPI predoctoral Fellowship. This is a contribution to NECLIME. The comments of Hans de Bruijn and an anonymous reviewer are gratefully acknowledged, and helped to improve the manuscript.

Supplementary material

12549_2015_199_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (192 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 192 kb)

References

  1. Abdul Aziz, H., Böhme, M., Rocholl, A., Prieto, J., Wijbrans, J. R., Bachtadse, V., et al. (2010). Integrated stratigraphy and 40Ar/39Ar chronology of the Early to Middle Miocene Upper Freshwater Molasse in western Bavaria (Germany). International Journal of Earth Sciences, 99, 1859–1886.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Abusch-Siewert, S. (1983). Gebissmorphologische Untersuchungen an eurasiatischen Anchitherien (Equidae, Mammalia) unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Fundstelle Sandelzhausen. Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg, 62, 1–401.Google Scholar
  3. Aguilar, J.-P., Antoine, P.-O., Crochet, J.-Y., López-Martínez, N., Grégoire, M., Michaux, J., et al. (2003). Les mammifères du Miocène inférieur de Beaulieu (Bouchesdu-Rhône, France), comparaison avec Wintershof-West et le problème de la limite MN3/MN4. Coloquios de Paleontología, Numero extraordinario, 1, 1–24.Google Scholar
  4. Álvarez Sierra, M. A., Daams, R., & van der Meulen, A. J. (1987). The mammals from the Lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). 7. The Eomyidae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, ser B, 90(1), 47–56.Google Scholar
  5. Astibia, H. (2012). The Palaeomerycidae (Artiodactyla) from Sansan. Mammifères de Sansan, 203, 201–224.Google Scholar
  6. Bolliger, T. (1996). A current understanding about the Anomalomyidae (Rodentia): reflections on stratigraphy, Paleobiogeography, and evolution. In R. L. Bernor, V. Fahlbusch, & H. W. Mittmann (Eds.), The evolution of western Eurasian Neogene Mammal Faunas (pp. 235–245). New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Bolliger, T. (1999). Family Anomalomyidae. In G. Rössner, & K. Heissig (Eds.), The Miocene land mammals of Europe (pp. 411–420). München: Pfeil.Google Scholar
  8. Bosma, A. A., de Bruijn, H., & Wessels, W. (2013). Late Miopcene Sciuridae (Mammalia, Rodentia) from Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 33(4), 924–942.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bruijn, H. de. (1999). Superfamily Sciuroidea In G. Rössner, & K. Heissig (Eds.), The Miocene land mammals of Europe (pp. 271–280). München: Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil.Google Scholar
  10. Bruijn, H. de. (2009). The Eumyarion (Mammalia, Rodentia, Muridae) assemblage from Sandelzhausen (Miocene, Southern Germany): a test on homogeneity. Palaeontologische Zeitschrift, 83(1), 77–83.Google Scholar
  11. Bruijn, H. de, & Meulen, A. J. van der (1979). A review of the Neogene rodent succesion in Greece. Annales Géologiques des Pays Helleniques. Athènes, Hors série, 1979(1), 207–217.Google Scholar
  12. Bruijn, H. de, & Saraç, G. (1991). Early Miocene rodent faunas from the eastern Mediterranean area. Part I. The genus Eumyarion. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, 94(1), 1–36.Google Scholar
  13. Bruijn, H. de, Meulen, A. J. van der, & Katsikatsos, G. (1980). The mammals from the lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece) 1. The Sciuridae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenshappen, sér. B, 83(3), 241–261.Google Scholar
  14. Bruijn, H. de, Ünay, E., Saraç, G., & Klein Hofmeijer, G. (1987). An unusual new euricetodontine from the Lower Miocene of the eastern Mediterranean. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, Ser. B, 90(2), 119–132.Google Scholar
  15. Bruijn, H. de, Fahlbusch, V., Sarac, G., & Ünay, E. (1993). Early Miocene Rodent Faunas from the Eastern Mediterranean Area.3. The Genera Deperetomys and Critetodon with a Discussion of the Evolutionary History of the Cricetodontini. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, 96(2), 151–216.Google Scholar
  16. Bruijn, H. de, Mayda, S., Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, Kaya, T., & Sarac, G. (2006). Small mammals from the Early Miocene of Sabuncebeli (Manisa, S.W. Anatolia, Turkey). Beiträge zur Paläontologie, 30, 57–87.Google Scholar
  17. Bruijn, H. de, Markovic, Z., & Wessels, W. (2013). Late Oligocene rodents from Banovici (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Palaeodiversity, 6, 63–105.Google Scholar
  18. Bruijn, H. de, Bosma, A. A., & Wessels, W. (2015). Are the Rhizomyinae and the Spalacinae closely related? Contradistinctive conclusions between genetics and paleontology. In L. W. van den Hoek Ostende, P. Pelaez-Campomanes & W. Wessels (eds.), Old worlds, new ideas. A tribute to Albert van der Meulen. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments 95(3) (this issue). doi: 10.1007/s12549-015-0195-y.
  19. Casanovas-Vilar, I., Garcia-Paredes, I., Alba, D. M., Ostende, L. W. van den, & Moya-Sola, S. (2010). The European Far West: Miocene mammal isolation, diversity and turnover in the Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Biogeography, 37(6), 1079–1093.Google Scholar
  20. Core Team, R. (2014). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. Vienna: R Foundation for Statistical Computing.Google Scholar
  21. Cuvier, G. (1825). Recherches sur les ossemens fossiles de quadrupèdes, où l'on rétablit les caractères de plusieurs espèces d'animaux que les révolutions du globe paraissent avoir détruites (3e édth ed.). Paris: Dufour et d’Ocagne éditions.Google Scholar
  22. Daams, R. (1999). Family Gliridae. In G. Rössner, & K. Heissig (Eds.), The Miocene land mammals of Europe (pp. 301–318). München: Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil.Google Scholar
  23. Doukas, C. S. (1986). The mammals from the Lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). Part 5. The insectivores. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, Ser. B Physical Sciences, 89(1), 15–38.Google Scholar
  24. Doukas, C. S. (2003). The MN4 faunas of Aliveri and Karydia (Greece). Coloquios de Paleontología, Volumen Extraordinario, 1, 127–132.Google Scholar
  25. Doukas C. S., van den Hoek Ostende L. W. (2006). Insectivores (Erinaceomorpha, Soricomorpha; Mammalia) from Karydia and Komotini (Thrace, Greece; MN 4/5). Beiträge zur Paläontologie, 30, 109–131.Google Scholar
  26. Erbajeva, M. (1994). Phylogeny and evolution of Ochotonidae with emphasis on Asian ochotonids. In Y. Tomida, C. K. Li, & T. Setoguchi (Eds.), Rodent and Lagomorph families of asian origins and diversification (Vol. 8, pp. 1–13). Tokyo: National Science Museum Monographs.Google Scholar
  27. Eronen, J. T., Ataabadi, M. M., Micheels, A., Karme, A., Bernor, R. L., & Fortelius, M. (2009). Distribution history and climatic controls of the Late Miocene Pikermian chronofauna. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106, 11867–11871.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Fejfar, O., & Sabol, M. (2005). Czech Republic and Slovak Republic. Scripta Geologica Special Issue, 5, 51–60.Google Scholar
  29. Fejfar, O., & Schmidt-Kittler, N. (1984). Sivanasua und Euboictis n. gen. - zwei pflanzenfressende Schleichkatzen vor laufer (Viverridae, Carnivora, Mammalia) im europaischen Untermiozan. Mainzer Geowissenschaftliche Mitteilungen, 13, 49–72.Google Scholar
  30. Fejfar, O., Schmidt-Kittler, N., & Rummel, M. (1997). Sivanasua viverroides (Schlosser, 1916) from the Lower Miocene fissure filling Rothenstein 1/13/. Münchner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen Reihe A Geologie und Paläontologie, 34, 93–110.Google Scholar
  31. Flynn, L. J. (2009). The antiquity of Rhizomys and independent acquisition of fossorial traits in subterranean muroids. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 331, 128–156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Fortelius, M. (2014). Neogene of the Old World Database of Fossil Mammals (NOW). University of Helsinki. http://www.helsinki.fi/science/now/ - downloaded September 2014.
  33. Furió, M., Casanovas-Vilar, I., Moyá-Solá, S., Köhler, M., Galindo, J., & Alba, D. M. (2011). Insectivores (Eulipotyphla; Mammalia) from the Middle Miocene of Barranc de Can Vila 1 (Vallès-Penedès Basin, Catalonia, Spain). Geobios, 44, 199–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Furió, M., Ruiz-Sánchez, F. J., Crespo, V. D., Freudenthal, M., & Montoya, P. (2012). The southernmost Miocene occurrence of the last European herpetotheriid Amphiperatherium frequens (Metatheria, Mammalia). Comptes Rendus Palevol, 11, 371–377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Furió, M., Prieto, J., Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (2015). Three million years of ‘Terror-Shrew’ (Dinosorex, Eulipotyphla, Mammalia) in the Miocene of the Vallès-Penedès Basin (Barcelona, Spain). Comptes Rendus Palevol. 14(2), 111–124. doi: 10.1016/j.crpv.2014.12.001.
  36. Ginsburg, L., & Heintz, E. (1968). La plus ancienne antilope d'Europe, Eotragus artenensis du Burdigalien d'Artenay. Bulletin du Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 40(4), 837–842.Google Scholar
  37. Ginsburg, L., & Morales, J. (1999). The genus Sivanasua (Lophocyoninae, Hyaenodontidae, Creodonta, Mammalia) in the Miocene of France. Estudios Geológicos, 55, 173–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (1989). The Talpidae (Insectivora, Mammalia) of Eggingen-Mittelhart (Baden-Württemberg, (F.R.G.) with special reference to the Paratalpa-Desmanodon lineage. Stuttgarter Beiträge zur Naturkunde B, 152, 1–29.Google Scholar
  39. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (1992). Insectivore faunas from the Lower Miocene of Anatolia. Part 1: Erinaceidae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, ser. B, 95(4), 437–467.Google Scholar
  40. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (1995). Insectivore faunas from the Lower Miocene of Anatolia. Part 3: Dimylidae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, 98(1), 19–38.Google Scholar
  41. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (1997). Insectivores from the Lower Miocene of Anatolia. part 4: The genus Desmanodon (Talpidae) with the description of a new species from the Lower Miocene of Spain. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen,100(1/2), 27–65.Google Scholar
  42. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (2001). Insectivore faunas from the Lower Miocene of Anatolia. Part 8: Stratigraphy, palaeoecology, palaeobiogeography. Scripta Geologica, 122, 101–122.Google Scholar
  43. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (2003). Insectivores (Erinaceomorpha, Soricomorpha, Mammalia) from the Ramblian of the Daroca-Calamocha area. Coloquios de Paleontología, Volumen Extraordinario, 1, 281–310.Google Scholar
  44. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, & Doukas, C. S. (2003). Distribution and evolutionary history of the Early Miocene erinaceid Galerix symeonidisi Doukas, 1986. In J. W. F. Reumer, & W. Wessels (Eds.), Distribution and migration of Tertiary mammals in Eurasia. A volume in honour of Hans de Bruijn (pp. 287–303): Deinsea 10.Google Scholar
  45. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, & Fejfar, O. (2006). Erinaceidae and Talpidae (Erinaceomorpha, Soricomorpha, Mammalia) from the Lower Miocene of Merkur-Nord (Czech Republic, MN 3). Beiträge zur Paläontologie, 30, 175–203.Google Scholar
  46. Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, & Furió, M. (2005). The fossil record of the Eurasian Neogene Insectivores (Erinaceomorpha, Soricomorpha, Mammalia): Spain. Scripta Geologica, Special Issue (5), 148–284.Google Scholar
  47. Hordijk, K., Bosma, A. A., Bruijn, H. de, Dam, J. van, Geraedts, C., Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, Reumer, J. W. F., & Wessels, W. (2015) Biostratigraphic and paleoecologic implications of the small mammal assemblage from the late Early Miocene of Montalvos 2, Teruel Basin, Spain. In L. W. van den Hoek Ostende, P. Pelaez-Campomanes & W. Wessels (eds.), Old worlds, new ideas. A tribute to Albert van der Meulen. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments 95(3) (this issue). doi: 10.1007/s12549-015-0203-2.
  48. Kälin, D., & Kempf, O. (2009). High-resolution stratigraphy from the continental record of the Middle Miocene Northern Alpine Foreland Basin of Switzerland. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Palaontologie-Abhandlungen, 254(1–2), 177–235.Google Scholar
  49. Klein Hofmeijer, G., & Bruijn, H. de (1985). The mammals from the Lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). Part 4. The Spalacidae and Anomalomyidae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, ser. B, 88(2), 185–198.Google Scholar
  50. Klein Hofmeijer, G., & Bruijn, H. de (1988). The mammals from the Lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). Part 8: the Cricetidae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen,ser. B, 91(2), 185–204.Google Scholar
  51. Klietmann, J., Nagel, D., Rummel, M., & Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (2014a). Amphiperatherium and Erinaceidae of Petersbuch 28. Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(1), 1–20. doi: 10.3140/bull.geosci.1454.
  52. Klietmann, J., Nagel, D., Rummel, M., & Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (2014b). Enlightening complexity. The Dimylidae of Petersbuch 28. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, 94(3), 463–479. doi: 10.1007/s12549-013-0137-5.
  53. Klietmann, J., Nagel, D., Rummel, M., & Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den (2014c). Heterosorex and Soricidae (Eulipotyphla, Mammalia) of the fissure Petersbuch 28; micro-evolution as indicator of temporal mixing? Comptes Rendus Palevol, 13(3), 157–181. doi: 10.1016/j.crpv.2013.10.001.
  54. Koufos, G. D. (2006). Palaeoecology and chronology of the Vallesian (late Miocene) in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 234(2–4), 127–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Koufos, G. D., Kostopoulos, D. S., & Vlachou, T. D. (2005). Neogene/Quaternary mammalian migrations in Eastern Mediterranean. Belgian Journal of Zoology, 135(2), 181–190.Google Scholar
  56. Larrasoaña, J. C., Murelaga, X., & Garcés, M. (2006). Magnetobiochronology of Lower Miocene (Ramblian) continental sediments from the Tudela Formation (western Ebro basin, Spain). Earth and Planetary Science Leters, 243, 409–423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. López Martinez, N. (1986). The mammals from the lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). 6. The ochotonid lagomorph Albertona balkanica n. gen. n. sp. And its relationships. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie Van Wetenschappen, ser. B, 89(2), 177–194.Google Scholar
  58. Made, J. van der (2012). Eotragus clavatus (Artiodactyla, Bovidae, Boselaphini) from Sansan. Mammiferes de Sansan, 203, 145–199.Google Scholar
  59. Maridet, O., Wu, W.-Y., Ye, J., Bi, S.-D., Ni, X.-J., & Meng, J. (2011). Earliest occurrence of Democricetodon in China in the Early Miocene of the Junggar Basin (Xinjiang), and comparison with the genus Spanocricetodon. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 49(4), 393–405.Google Scholar
  60. Markovic, Z. (2010). Albertona balkanica from Early Miocene of Snegotin (Serbia) - implications for the distribution and evolution of Miocene Ochotonidae. Annales de Paleontologie, 96(2), 25–32. doi: 10.1016/j.annpal.2010.10.003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Mayda, S. (2004). Early Miocene fauna from Western Anatolia (Sabuncubeli-Manisa). 5th International Symposium on Eastern Mediterranean Geology, Vol. 1 (pp. 330-332). Thessaloniki, GreeceGoogle Scholar
  62. Mayda, S. (2010). The Early Miocene carnivores from Sabuncubeli, Turkey. Geologica Balcanica, 39, 245–246.Google Scholar
  63. Meulen, A. J. van der, & Bruijn, H. de (1982). The mammals from the Lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). Part 2. The Gliridae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Akademie van Wetenschappen, Ser. B, 85(4), 485–524.Google Scholar
  64. Meulen, A. J. van der, Garcia-Paredes, I., Angeles Alvarez-Sierra, M., Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, Hordijk, K., Oliver, A., et al. (2011). Biostratigraphy or biochronology? Lessons from the Early and Middle Miocene small Mammal Events in Europe. Geobios, 44(2–3), 309–321. doi: 10.1016/j.geobios.2010.11.004.
  65. Meulen, A. J. van den, Garcia-Paredes, I., Alvarez-Sierra, M. A., Hoek Ostende, L. W. van den, Hordijk, K., Oliver, A., et al. (2012). Updated Aragonian biostratigraphy: Small Mammal distribution and its implications for the Miocene European Chronology. Geologica Acta, 10(2), 159–179. doi: 10.1344/105.000001710.
  66. Oksanen, J., Blanchet, F. G., Kindt, R., Legendre, P., Minchin, P. R., O'Hara, R. B., Simpson, G. L., Solymos, P., Henry, M., Stevens, H., & Wagner, H. (2015) vegan: Community Ecology Package. R package version 2.2-1. http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=vegan.
  67. Oliver, A., & Peláez-Campomanes, P. (2014a). Early Miocene evolution of the genus Megacricetodon in Europe and its palaeobiogeographical implications. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. doi: 10.4202/app.00099.2014.Google Scholar
  68. Oliver, A., & Peláez-Campomanes, P. (2014b). Evolutionary patterns of early and middle Aragonian (Miocene) of Megacricetodon (Rodentia, Mammalia) from Spain. Palaeontographica Abteilung A, 303(4–6), 85–135.Google Scholar
  69. Peigne, S., Vianey-Liaud, M., Pelissie, T., & Sige, B. (2014). Valbro: A new site of vertebrates from the early Oligocene (MP22) of France (Quercy). I - Geological context; Mammalia: Rodentia, Hyaenodontida, Carnivora. Annales de Paleontologie, 100(1), 1–45. doi: 10.1016/j.annpal.2013.11.002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Pelaez-Campomanes, P., & Meulen, A. J. van der (2009). Diversity of mammals in the Neogene of Europe: comparing data quality of large and small mammals in the NOW database. Hellenic Journal of Geosciences, 44, 105–115.Google Scholar
  71. Pilgrim, G. E. (1939). The fossil Bovidae of India. Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, new series, 26(1), 1–356.Google Scholar
  72. Popov, S. V., Rögl, F., Rozanov, A. Y., Steininger, F. F., Shcherba, I. G., & Kovac, M. M. (2004). Lithological-Paleogeographic maps of Paratethys; 10 maps Late Eocene to Pliocene. Vol. 250: Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg.Google Scholar
  73. QGIS Development Team (2015). QGIS Geographic Information System. Open Source Geospatial Foundation Project. http://qgis.osgeo.org.
  74. Reichenbacher, B., Krijgsman, W., Lataster, Y., Pippèrr, M., Baak, C. C., Chang, L., et al. (2013). A new magnetostratigraphic framework for the Lower Miocene (Burdigalian/Ottnangian, Karpatian) in the North Alpine Foreland Basin. Swiss Journal of Geosciences, 106(2), 309–334. doi: 10.1007/s00015-013-0142-8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Roger, O. (1898). Wirbelthierreste aus dem Dinotheriensande der bayerisch-schwäbischen Hochebene. I. Teil. Bericht des Naturwissenschaftlichen Vereins für Schwaben und Neuburg (e.V.) Augsburg, 33, 385–396.Google Scholar
  76. Rössner, G. E. (2006). A community of Middle Miocene Ruminantia (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from the German Molasse Basin. Palaeontographica Abteilung A Palaeozoologie-Stratigraphie, 277(1–6), 103–112.Google Scholar
  77. Rössner, G. E. (2010). Systematics and palaeoecology of Ruminantia (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) from the Miocene of Sandelzhausen (southern Germany, northern Alpine foreland basin). Paläontologische Zeitschrift, 84, 123–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Ruiz-Sánchez, F. J., Murelaga, X., Freudenthal, M., Larrasoaña, J. C., Furió, M., Garcés, M., González-Pardos, M. & Suárez-Hernando, O. (2013) Micromammalian faunas from the Middle Miocene (Middle Aragonian) of the Tudela Formation (Ebro Basin, Spain). Bulletin of Geosciences, 88(1), 131–152.Google Scholar
  79. Saraç, G. 2003. Türkiye omurgalı fosil yatakları. MTA Rapor no: 10609, Ankara, 1–218.Google Scholar
  80. Schmidt-Kittler, N. (1983). The mammals from the Lower Miocene of Aliveri (Island of Evia, Greece). 3. On a new species of Sivanasua Pilgrim, 1931 (Feliforma, Carnivora) and the phylogenetic position of this genus. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, sers B, 86(3), 301–318.Google Scholar
  81. Sen, S., Seyitoglu, G., Karadenizli, L., Kazanci, N., Varol, B., & Araz, H. (1998). Mammalian biochronology of Neogene deposits and its correlation with the lithostratigraphy in the Cankiri-Corum Basin, central Anatolia, Turkey. Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae, 91(3), 307–320.Google Scholar
  82. Ten Veen, J. H., & Kleinspehn, K. L. (2002). Geodynamics along an increasingly curved convergent plate margin: Late Miocene-Pleistocene Rhodes, Greece. Tectonics, 21(3), doi: 10.1029/2001tc001287.
  83. Thenius, E. (1948). Über ein stammesgeschichtlich interessantes Stadium aus der Geschichte der Hirsche. Anzeiger der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathemathisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Klasse, 14, 219–254.Google Scholar
  84. Theocharopoulos, K. D. (2000). Late Oligocene–middle Miocene Democricetodon and Spanocricetodon from the eastern Mediterranean area. Gaia, 8, 1–92.Google Scholar
  85. Ünay, E. (1994). Early Miocene rodent faunas from the eastern Mediterranean area 4. The Gliridae. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, 97(4), 445–490.Google Scholar
  86. Ünay, E. (1996). On fossil Spalacidae. In R. L. Bernor, V. Fahlbusch, & H. W. Mittmann (Eds.), The evolution of western Eurasian Neogene Mammal Faunas (pp. 246–252). New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  87. Ünay, E., & Göktaş, F. (1999). Late Early Miocene and Quaternary small mammals in the surroundings of Soke (Aydin): preliminary results. Türkiye Jeoloji Bülteni, 42(2), 99–113.Google Scholar
  88. Ünay, E., Bruijn, H. de, & Saraç, G. (2003). A preliminary zonation of the continental Neogene of Anatolia based on rodents. Deinsea, 10, 539–547.Google Scholar
  89. Ziegler, R. (1985). Talpiden (Mammalia, Insectivora) aus dem Orleanium und Astaracium Bayerns. Mitteilungen der Bayerischen Staatssammlung fuer Palaeontologie und Historische Geologie, 25, 131–175.Google Scholar
  90. Ziegler, R. (1989). Heterosoricidae und Soricidae (Insectivora, Mammalia) aus dem Oberoligozän und Untermiozän Süddeutschlands. Stuttgarter Beitraege zur Naturkunde Serie B (Geologie und Palaeontologie), 1–73Google Scholar
  91. Ziegler, R. (1990). Talpidae (Insectivora, Mammalia) aus dem Oberoligozän und Untermiozän Süddeutschlands. Stuttgarter Beiträge zur Naturkunde Serie B (Geologie und Palaeontologie), 1–81.Google Scholar
  92. Ziegler, R. (1994). Bisher übersehene Insectivora (Mammalia) aus dem Untermiozän von Wintershof-West bei Eichstätt (Bayern). Mitteilungen der Bayerischen Staatssammlung für Palaeontologie und Historische Geologie, 34, 291–306.Google Scholar
  93. Ziegler, R., & Fahlbusch, V. (1986). Kleinsäuger-Faunen aus der basalen Oberen Süsswasser-Molasse Niederbayerns. Zitteliana, 14, 3–58.Google Scholar
  94. Zijlstra, J. S., & Flynn, L. J. (2015) Hedgehogs (Erinaceidae, Lipotyphla) from the Miocene of Pakistan, with description of a new species of Galerix. In L. W. van den Hoek Ostende, P. Pelaez-Campomanes & W. Wessels (eds.), Old worlds, new ideas. A tribute to Albert van der Meulen. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, 95(3) (this issue). doi: 10.1007/s12549-015-0190-3.

Copyright information

© Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lars W. van den Hoek Ostende
    • 1
    Email author
  • Serdar Mayda
    • 2
  • Adriana Oliver
    • 3
  • Anneke Madern
    • 1
    • 4
  • Veronica Hernández-Ballarín
    • 3
  • Pablo Peláez-Campomanes
    • 3
  1. 1.Naturalis Biodiversity CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.EGE University Natural History MuseumMerkez BornovaTurkey
  3. 3.Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSICMadridSpain
  4. 4.Institu Català de PaleontologiaCerdanyola del VallèsSpain

Personalised recommendations