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Journal of Population Research

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 119–140 | Cite as

Ethnic disparities in social and economic well-being of the immigrant aged in Australia

Article

Abstract

The paper examines ethnic differences in the social and economic well-being of the immigrant aged in Australia and the factors affecting older immigrants’ well-being as measured by a number of indicators. The data analysis is guided by the concept of the ‘Third Age’ as the basis for a more positive approach to the discussion of ageing and as a life-cycle stage of independent living in old age, focusing on the pursuit of an active retirement and the absence of core activity restrictions. Data from the 2006 population census on living arrangements, need for assistance with daily activities, income, participation in paid work and volunteering, and provision of care to other family members are used to examine the social and economic well-being of the immigrant population aged 65 and over identified by their country or region of origin and in comparison with the Australian-born aged. Policy implications of the research findings are discussed.

Keywords

Ethnicity Social and economic well-being Immigrants Aged Australia 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The paper is part of a research project on the ageing experiences of older Australians of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The project was funded by a research grant from the National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre and the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Demographic and Social Research InstituteThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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