Journal of Population Research

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 91–112

The impact of incomplete geocoding on small area population estimates

  • Jack Baker
  • Adelamar Alcantara
  • Xiaomin Ruan
  • Kendra Watkins
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12546-011-9077-y

Cite this article as:
Baker, J., Alcantara, A., Ruan, X. et al. J Pop Research (2012) 29: 91. doi:10.1007/s12546-011-9077-y

Abstract

Small-area population estimates are often made using geocoded address data in conjunction with the housing-unit method. Previous research, however, suggests that these data are subject to systematic incompleteness that biases estimates of race, ethnicity, and other important demographic characteristics. This incompleteness is driven largely by an inability to complete georeference address-based datasets. Given these challenges, small-area demographers need further, and to date largely unavailable, information on the amount of error typically introduced by using incompletely geocoded data to estimate population. More specifically, we argue that applied demographers should like to know if these errors are statistically significant, spatially patterned, or systematically related to specific population characteristics. This paper evaluates the impact of incomplete geocoding on accuracy in small-area population estimates, using a Vintage 2000 set of block-group estimates of the household population for the Albuquerque, NM metro area. Precise estimates of the impact of incomplete geocoding on the accuracy of estimates are made, associations with specific demographic characteristics are considered, and a simple potential remediation based on Horvitz-Thompson theory is presented. The implications of these results for the practice of applied demography are reviewed.

Keywords

Small area estimation Housing-unit method Geocoding 

Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Baker
    • 1
  • Adelamar Alcantara
    • 2
  • Xiaomin Ruan
    • 1
  • Kendra Watkins
    • 3
  1. 1.Geospatial and Population StudiesUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Department of Geography, Geospatial and Population StudiesUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  3. 3.Mid-Region Council of GovernmentsAlbuquerqueUSA

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