Journal of Population Research

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 45–89

Ethnic population projections for the UK, 2001–2051

  • Philip Rees
  • Pia Wohland
  • Paul Norman
  • Peter Boden
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12546-011-9076-z

Cite this article as:
Rees, P., Wohland, P., Norman, P. et al. J Pop Research (2012) 29: 45. doi:10.1007/s12546-011-9076-z

Abstract

This paper reports on projections of the United Kingdom’s ethnic group populations for 2001–2051. For the years 2001–2007 we estimate fertility rates, survival probabilities, internal migration probabilities and international migration flows for 16 ethnic groups and 355 UK areas. We make assumptions about future component rates, probabilities and flows and feed these into our projection model. This model is a cohort-component model specified for single years of age to 100+. To handle this large state space, we employed a bi-regional model. We implement four projections: (1) a benchmark projection that uses the component inputs for 2001; (2) a trend projection where assumptions beyond 2007 are adjusted to those in the UK 2008-based National Population Projections (NPP); (3) a projection that modifies the NPP assumptions and (4) a projection that uses a different emigration assumption. The projected UK population ranges between a low of 63 millions in 2051 under the first projection to a high of 79 million in the third projection. Under all projections ethnic composition continues to change: the White British, White Irish and Black Caribbean groups experience the slowest growth and lose population share; the Other White and Mixed groups to experience relative increases in share; South Asian groups grow strongly as do the Chinese and Other Ethnic groups. The ethnic minority share of the population increases from 13% (2001) to 25% in the trend projection but to only 20% under our modified emigration projection. However, what is certain is that the UK can look forward to be becoming a more diverse nation by mid-century.

Keywords

Ethnic groups Population projections United Kingdom Ethnic composition Bi-regional model Cohort-component model 

Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Rees
    • 1
  • Pia Wohland
    • 2
  • Paul Norman
    • 1
  • Peter Boden
    • 3
  1. 1.School of GeographyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  2. 2.Institute for Ageing and HealthNewcastle UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK
  3. 3.Edge Analytics LtdLeeds Innovations CentreLeedsUK

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