Journal of Population Research

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 305–326 | Cite as

The geography and demography of Indigenous temporary mobility: an analysis of the 2006 census snapshot

Article

Abstract

Local area population counts and estimates are crucial inputs into policy planning and processes. However, population mobility in general, as well as large numbers of visitors to particular areas, place additional demands on resources and those providing essential services. The literature identifies a pressing need for standardized quantitative measures of the volume, frequency and flows of Indigenous temporary mobility and comparable spatial scales. This paper presents an analysis of census data as it relates to Indigenous temporary mobility, and explores the spatial and demographic complexities involved. While the census remains the only consistent and nationally comprehensive data set on Indigenous temporary mobility that provides important insights, the overall findings from this analysis suggest that it remains a relatively blunt instrument in the task of identifying all the factors in Indigenous temporary movement. We conclude that researchers, policy makers and Indigenous populations must seek and develop additional data sources from which the drivers and dynamics of Indigenous temporary mobility and residency patterns may be identified.

Keywords

Indigenous Temporary mobility Census Geographic analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

A number of organizations and individuals provided helpful feedback on an early draft of this work, including officers of the Standing Committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs (SCATSIA) and the Productivity Commission. In addition we would like to thank John Taylor and Jon Altman from within CAEPR for detailed and constructive comments on earlier drafts of the paper as well as two anonymous referees. Finally and most importantly, we would like to thank Gillian Cosgrove who gave editorial assistance and prepared the final document as well as Mandy Yap and Hilary Bek for detailed proofing.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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