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PalZ

, Volume 90, Issue 2, pp 389–397 | Cite as

A new thalloid liverwort: Pallaviciniites sandaolingensis sp. nov. from the Middle Jurassic of Turpan–Hami Basin, NW China

  • Rui-Yun Li
  • Xue-lian Wang
  • Jing-Wei Chen
  • Sheng-Hui Deng
  • Zi-Xi Wang
  • Jun-Ling Dong
  • Bai-Nian SunEmail author
Research Paper

Abstract

Here we described a fossil thalloid liverwort from the Middle Jurassic Xishanyao Formation, Turpan–Hami Basin, China, preserved as a carbonized compression in greyish-green siltstones. The fossil thalloid liverwort is characterized by the long and strap-like thallus with a well-defined costa, entire margins and polygonal cells in the thallus wings. Following comparisons of the present fossil with extant and other related fossil liverworts, a new species, Pallaviciniites sandaolingensis sp. nov., is established in the subclass Pallaviciniineae, Pallaviciniales of the new classification system. It is probable that Pallaviciniites sandaolingensis grew on moist soils and rock surfaces near lakes and rivers in a humid and warm environment.

Keywords

Pallaviciniites Liverwort Paleoecology Turpan–Hami Basin Middle Jurassic 

Kurzfassung

Hier beschreiben wir aus der mitteljurassischen Xishanyao-Formation des Turpan-Hami-Beckens in China ein fossiles thalloses Lebermoos, welches als kohliger Abdruck in grau-grünem Siltstein erhalten ist. Dieses Lebermoos ist durch einen langen, schlaufenähnlichen Thallus mit klar abgegrenzten Rippen, ganzen Rändern und polygonalen Zellen in den Thallusflügeln gekennzeichnet. Nach detailliertem Vergleich des vorliegenden Fossils mit heutigen und anderen fossilen Lebermoosen, wird die neue Art Pallaviciniites sandaolingensis sp. nov. innerhalb der Pallaviciniineae (Pallaviciniales der neuen Klassifikation) errichtet. Wahrscheinlich wuchs P. sandaolingensis auf feuchten Böden und Gesteinsoberflächen in der Nähe von Seen und Flüssen in einer humiden und warmen Umgebung.

Schlüsselworte

Pallaviciniites Lebermoose Paläoökologie Turpan-Hami-Becken Mittlerer Jura 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Prof. Defei Yan, Dr. Sanping Xie, and Dr. Jingyu Wu (Lanzhou University, China) for their helpful suggestions, and Prof. Pengcheng Wu and Meizhi Wang (Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) for providing the extant specimens and helpful discussion. This work is supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20120211110022), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. lzujbky-2015-200),and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2012CB822003),.

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Copyright information

© Paläontologische Gesellschaft 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rui-Yun Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xue-lian Wang
    • 1
  • Jing-Wei Chen
    • 1
  • Sheng-Hui Deng
    • 3
  • Zi-Xi Wang
    • 1
  • Jun-Ling Dong
    • 1
  • Bai-Nian Sun
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Earth Sciences and Key Laboratory of Mineral Resources in Western China (Gansu Province)Lanzhou UniversityLanzhouChina
  2. 2.Northwest University MuseumNorthwest UniversityXi’anChina
  3. 3.Laboratory CenterResearch Institute of Petroleum Exploration and DevelopmentBeijingChina

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