A review on IPMC material as actuators and sensors: Fabrications, characteristics and applications

Article

Abstract

In this paper we present a comprehensive review of ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) covering fundamentals of IPMC; from fabrication processes to control and applications. IPMC is becoming an increasingly popular material among scholars, engineers and scientists due to its inherent property of low activation voltage, large bending strain, i.e., transformation electrical energy to mechanical energy, and properties to be used as bidirectional material, i.e., it can be used as actuators and sensors. Among the diversity of electro active polymers (EAPs), recently developed IPMCs are good candidates for use in bio-related application because of their biocompatibility. Yet, the challenge remains in controlling a somewhat complicated material as mechanical, electrical and chemical properties interact with each other in the ionic polymer. Several IPMC fabrication processes, their mechanical characteristics and performance, a number of recent IPMC applications and pertaining mathematical modeling have been reported in this paper. Also we have attempted to present concisely the control of IPMC and effects of various factors in the performance of IPMC. The applications of IPMC have been growing, and recently more sophisticated IPMC actuator applications have been performed. This indicates that the IPMC actuators hold potential for more sophisticated control application. Extensive references are provided for more indepth explanation.

Kewords

IPMC actuator Sensors Electrodes Electro-active polymer Transfer function Ion-exchange polymer 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Precision Engineering and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg  2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical & Aerospace EngineeringSeoul National UniversityShinlim, Kwanak, SeoulKorea

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