Comparison of gait and cognitive function among the elderly with Alzheimer’s Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy

  • Jin-Seung Choi
  • Ho-Sang Oh
  • Dong-Won Kang
  • Kyung-Ryul Mun
  • Mi-Hyun Choi
  • Su-Jeong Lee
  • Jae-Woong Yang
  • Soon-Cheol Chung
  • Suk-Woo Mun
  • Gye-Rae Tack
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare gait pattern and cognitive function among elderly patients with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), elderly people with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Healthy Controls (HC). Twenty three elderly patients participated: 10 AD (77.2±6.84 yrs), 7 MC I(72.9±6.28 yrs), and 6 HC (71.6±5.78 yrs). Gait and Cognitive function were collected using an accelerometer attached to the foot and the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CREAD-K), respectively. To compare differences in gait performance among groups, mean stride time, magnitude and structure of gait variability and ratio of low frequency and high frequency (LF/HF ratio) of stride time sequence were used in this study. Results showed that gait variables (mean stride time, LF/HF ratio of stride time) were useful for classification between MCI and HC. Cognitive function (T1, T3, T4, T6, and T8 of CREAD-K) represented the difference between AD and HC. This study may provide a foundation for future work on progression of dementia.

Keywords

Alzheimer’s Disease Mild Cognitive Impairment Gait Cognitive test Elderly 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Precision Engineering and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jin-Seung Choi
    • 1
  • Ho-Sang Oh
    • 1
  • Dong-Won Kang
    • 1
  • Kyung-Ryul Mun
    • 1
  • Mi-Hyun Choi
    • 1
  • Su-Jeong Lee
    • 1
  • Jae-Woong Yang
    • 1
  • Soon-Cheol Chung
    • 1
  • Suk-Woo Mun
    • 2
  • Gye-Rae Tack
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical EngineeringKonkuk University & Research Institute of Biomedical EngineeringChungjuKorea
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, School of MedicineKonkuk UniversityChungjuKorea

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