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Tool wear, chip formation and workpiece surface issues in CBN hard turning: A review

  • Manu Dogra
  • Vishal S. Sharma
  • Anish Sachdeva
  • Narinder Mohan Suri
  • Jasminder Singh Dureja
Article

Abstract

Steel parts that carry critical loads in everything from automotive drive trains and jet engines to industrial bearings and metal-forming machinery are normally produced by a series of processes, including time-consuming and costly grinding and polishing operations. Due to the advent of super-hard materials such as polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) cutting tools and improved machine tool designs, hard turning has become an attractive alternative to grinding for steel parts. The potential of hard turning to eliminate the costs associated with additional finishing processes in conventional machining is appealing to industry. The objective of this paper, is to survey the recent research progress in hard turning with CBN tools in regard of tool wear, surface issues and chip formation. A significant pool of CBN turning studies has been surveyed in an attempt to achieve better understanding of tool wear, chip formation, surface finish, white layer formation, micro-hardness variation and residual stress on the basis of varying CBN content, binder, tool edge geometry, cooling methods and cutting parameters. Further important modeling techniques based on finite element, soft computing and other mathematical approaches used in CBN turning are reviewed. In conclusion, a summary of the CBN turning and modeling techniques is outlined and the scope of future work is presented.

Keywords

CBN Chamfer Residual stress White layer 

Nomenclature

BCBN

binderless CBN

CBN-L

low content CBN

CBN-H

high content CBN

FEA

finite element analysis

hBN

hexagonal boron nitride

MVO

minimum volume oil

Ra

Surface roughness

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Precision Engineering and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manu Dogra
    • 1
  • Vishal S. Sharma
    • 2
  • Anish Sachdeva
    • 2
  • Narinder Mohan Suri
    • 3
  • Jasminder Singh Dureja
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringSSG Panjab University Regional CentreHoshiarpurIndia
  2. 2.Department of Industrial & Production EngineeringNational Institute of TechnologyJalandharIndia
  3. 3.Department of Production Engg.Punajb Engineering CollegeChandigarhIndia
  4. 4.Department of Mech. Engg., Univ. College of Engg.Punjabi UniversityPatialaIndia

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