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International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 25, Issue 5, pp 558–568 | Cite as

Accelerometer-Derived Activity Phenotypes in Young Adults: a Latent Class Analysis

  • Erin K. Howie
  • Anne L. Smith
  • Joanne A. McVeigh
  • Leon M. Straker
Article

Abstract

Purpose

To identify “activity phenotypes” from accelerometer-derived activity characteristics among young adults.

Methods

Participants were young adults (n = 628, mean age, 22.1, SD 0.6) in the Raine Study in Western Australia. Sex-specific latent class analyses identified sub-groups using eight indicators derived from 7-day hip-worn Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers: daily steps, total daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), MVPA variation, MVPA intensity, MVPA bout duration, sedentary-to-light ratio, sedentary-to-light ratio variation, and sedentary bout duration.

Results

Five activity phenotypes were identified for women (n = 324) and men (n = 304). Activity phenotype 1 for both women (35%) and men (30%) represented average activity characteristics. Phenotype 2 for women (17%) and men (16%) was characterized by below average total activity and MVPA (10.6 and 16.7 min of MVPA/day, women and men respectively). Phenotype 3 for women (15%) and men (23%) was characterized by below average total physical activity, average MVPA (32.6 and 36.5 min/day), high sedentary-light ratio and long sedentary bouts. Phenotype 4 differed between women (29%) and men (18%) but both had low sedentary-to-light ratios and shorter sedentary bouts. Finally, phenotype 5 in both women (4%) and men (12%) was characterized by extreme MVPA metrics (81.3 and 96.1 min/day).

Conclusions

Five activity phenotypes were identified for each gender in this population of young adults which can help design targeted interventions to enhance or modulate activity phenotypes.

Keywords

Physical activity Sedentary Longitudinal Health outcomes Phenotypes 

Abbreviations

MVPA

moderate-to-vigorous physical activity

Notes

Acknowledgements

We sincerely thank all the Raine Study participants and their families, the Raine Study Team for cohort co-ordination and data collection and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council for their long-term contribution to funding the study over the last 25 years. Straker was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Research Fellowship 1019980. Funding for core management of the Raine Study has been provided by The University of Western Australia (UWA), Curtin University, The Telethon Kids Institute, Raine Medical Research Foundation, UWA Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Women’s and Infant’s Research Foundation, and Edith Cowan University. The 22-year follow-up was funded by The Centre for Sleep Science, School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology at University of Western Australia and National Health and Medical Research Council Project grant 104484. The authors declare that the results of the study are presented clearly, honestly, and without fabrication, falsification, or inappropriate data manipulation.

Funding

LS was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Research Fellowship 1019980. Funding for core management of the Raine Study has been provided by The University of Western Australia (UWA), Curtin University, The Telethon Kids Institute, Raine Medical Research Foundation, UWA Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Women’s and Infant’s Research Foundation, and Edith Cowan University. The 22-year follow-up was funded by The Centre for Sleep Science, School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology at University of Western Australia and National Health and Medical Research Council Project grant 104484.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Ethical Approval

This study was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committees at the University of Western Australia (RA/4/1/5202) and Curtin University (HR67/2013).

Informed Consent

Initial written, informed consent was obtained from all participants prior to collection at the age 22 follow-up.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erin K. Howie
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anne L. Smith
    • 2
  • Joanne A. McVeigh
    • 2
    • 3
  • Leon M. Straker
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.Curtin UniversityPerthAustralia
  3. 3.Exercise Laboratory, School of PhysiologyUniversity of WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa

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