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Correction to: Abstract 2018

Correction
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Correction to: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine October 2018, Volume 25, Supplement 1, pp 1–219

  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12529-018-9740-1

Lara Traeger, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard MedicalSchool, LTRAEGER@mgh.harvard.edu

The following corrections have been made to the Abstract Supplement:

Correction to author list:

O34.6

“IT’S LIKE TRYING TO FIT A PIECE INTO AN ALREADY NOT WORKING PUZZLE”: NON ADHERENCE TO INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS IN YOUNG PEOPLE WITH PROBLEMATIC ASTHMA: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

Christina Joanne Pearce1, Louise Fleming2,3, Amy Chan1, Angela Jamalzadeh3, Andrew Bush2, 3, Rob Horne1

1UCL School of Pharmacy, Centre for Behavioral Medicine – United Kingdom

2National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College – United Kingdom

3Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton Hospital – United Kingdom

Sub-optimal adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) leads to poor asthma control and exacerbations. Even while adherence is electronically monitored, over half of patients have adherence to ICS of <80%. No previously published research has used objective electronic monitoring device (EMD) data to qualitatively investigate nonadherence. This study aimed to investigate determinants of nonadherence using EMDs. Methods: Patients aged 12-17 years old with poor adherence to ICS (<80%) attending the Royal Brompton Hospital, took part in semi-structured interviews using their EMD data. The interview discussion guide was based on relevant adherence frameworks including the Perceptions and Practicality Approach. Interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis was conducted. Results: 20 patients were recruited, mean age of 14 years (range=12-17). Using thematic analysis five key themes emerged: Importance of parental encouragement and reminders; Trivialisation of the seriousness of asthma; Poor understanding of asthma as a long-term condition; Low necessity beliefs for ICS use daily in the absence of symptoms; and Difficulties in maintaining routine. Conclusion: Young people with PSA have complex beliefs related to the use of ICS. They and their families need to recognize asthma as severe and as a long-term condition. Interventions should focus on effective ways of communicating the nature of asthma and the need for daily preventer usage in the absence of daily symptoms and on shifting the reliance from the reliever to the preventer inhaler. Adherence support should be tailored to address both the motivation and the ability of the patient.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Christina Pearce, University College London, christina.pearce.15@ucl.ac.uk

Correction to author and affiliation list:

O36.5

THE PAIN COURSE: EVIDENCE OF EFFECTIVENESS OF AN ONLINE CBT PAIN MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME IN A RANDOMIZED TRIAL IN IRELAND

Brian McGuire1 2, Catherine Navin1 2, Jonathan Egan1, Brian Slattery1, Monika Pilch1, Laura O’Connor1, Stephanie Haugh1, Bevin Malone1, Cristina Perez1, Blake Dear2

1School of Psychology & Centre for Pain Research, National University of Ireland -- Ireland

2Department of Psychology & eCentreClinic, Macquarie University -- Australia

Background. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of people with chronic pain, access to these effective, evidence-based interventions is limited. Internet-based CBT (iCBT) has emerged as an innovative approach to address these treatment barriers. One such internet-delivered psychological pain management programme, the Pain Course, was developed and empirically tested in Australia. The Pain Course is a clinician guided iCBT programme for adults with chronic pain and the aim of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of this intervention in a sample of Irish adults with chronic pain. Methods. Following a pilot study to confirm the cultural suitability of the program, 133 individuals were randomly assigned to either a Treatment Group or wait-list Control Group. The Pain Course programme was a cognitive behaviour therapy intervention comprising five internet-delivered lessons, released sequentially over an 8 week period. The programme also included homework tasks, additional resources, weekly contact with a clinician via e-mail or telephone, and automated e-mails. The primary outcome was pain-related disability as measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). The secondary outcomes were depression, anxiety, pain severity, self-efficacy, fear of movement, pain impact, pain acceptance, and treatment satisfaction. The online measurements were conducted prior to the commencement of the Course and nine weeks after the start of the Course. Results. In terms of lesson completion, 80% of the Treatment Group completed all five lessons. Improvements were significantly greater for Treatment Group participants compared to Control Group participants in levels of disability, anxiety, depression, and average pain levels at posttreatment. Over 80% of participants rated the programme as highly acceptable. Overall, the clinician spent a total mean time of 83.4 min contact time per patient throughout the programme. Conclusion. The findings of the study suggest that a brief iCBT intervention is clinically effective, acceptable to patients, and efficient in terms of therapist contact time. The findings add to the existing literature and are broadly in line with previous trials of the Pain Course.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Brian McGuire, School of Psychology & Centre for Pain Research, National University of Ireland, brian.mcguire@nuigalway.ie

P168

EFFECTS OF PAST PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (AGED 13-18 YEARS) ON LATER LIFE IN ADULT HOOD OF JAPANESE WORKER

Kayoko Urakawa 1, Kazuhito Yokoyama1, Hiroaki Itoh1, Takehisa Matsukawa1, Fumihiko Kitamura1

1Juntendo University - Japan

Introduction: The relationship between SOC and exercise habit is not clear under the condition that was defined as exercising at least twice a week for 30minutes per bout, for more than one year as an exercise habit (Urakawa et al: ICBM 2014, Groningen). Therefore,we decided to study that not only the current exercise practice but also the exercise habits need to be taken as past health factors inthe time axis of ours life from birth. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship of past physical activity (aged13 to 18years) and psychological factors and medical checkups, BMI, smoking habits, etc. Methods: Self-administered questionnaires weredistributed among 467 workers of a company in Tokyo and 457 agreed to participate in this study that recovered by mail during 2013.The questionnaires included questions on demographic variables and past physical activity (aged 13-18 years) of subjects who refers toasked the question item “Do you think about your physical activity habits during 13 to 18 years old who moved a lot compared to otherpeople?”, and answers is 1 = “I do not think so at all” 2 = “I do not think so much” 3 = “Somewhat agree” 4 = “I think so” 5 = “I think sovery much”. Results: They consisted of males (90.6%) and 43 females (9.4%), with average ages of 42.1(SD 10.4) and 38.5 (SD 10.8)years. Comparing the difference in mean values between two groups of past physical activity habits (inactive: n = 132, active: n = 325)(one-way analysis of variance), the active group has better SOC scores (p < 0.05) and self-esteem score was high (p < 0.01).Relationships were found between past physical activity habits and current smoking habits (smoking: n = 164, quit: n = 114, no-smoking:n = 179) (p < 0.01) (chi-square test). Result of regression analysis with male only 414, self - esteem scale scores as objective variables,self-esteem is affected by SOC scores (β = 0.452, p < 0.000), Depression Scale Score (CES-D) (β = -0.198, p < 0.000), past physicalactivity habits (β = 0.115, p < 0.01), age (β = 0.100, p = 0.011) (SPSS Ver. 23 stepwise method). Conclusions: Those who recalled thetime at the age of 13 to 18 and responded that the physical activity was high compared with others suggested that the SOC and selfesteemas stress-coping ability tended to be high.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Kayoko Urakawa, Juntendo University, kurakawa@juntendo.ac.jp

Notes

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© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2018

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