Rare giants? A large female great white shark caught in Brazilian waters

  • Alberto Ferreira Amorim
  • Carlos A. Arfelli
  • Hugo Bornatowski
  • Nigel E. Hussey
Short Communication

Abstract

Here, we document an historical record of a large great white shark (GWS) captured in southern Brazilian waters, including morphometric measurements, basic biological data on internal organs and stomach contents. The captured shark was a female of 530 cm TL (503 cm fork-length), with an estimated total body weight of 2.5 tons. The stomach contained six shark heads, the remains of two dolphins and one teleost fish. The estimated hepatic somatic index (HSI) was 27%, and to our knowledge, represents the largest liver scientifically documented for this species to date. White sharks are known to undertake large-scale oceanic and transoceanic migrations. It is possible that the occasional records of white sharks off Brazil, previous records from Argentina and Uruguay, and an individual captured of Tristan da Cunha may be linked to migratory movements in the South Atlantic.

Keywords

Lamnidae Migration Hepatic somatic index Carcharodon carcharias 

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Copyright information

© Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Ferreira Amorim
    • 1
  • Carlos A. Arfelli
    • 1
  • Hugo Bornatowski
    • 2
  • Nigel E. Hussey
    • 3
  1. 1.Instituto de Pesca (IP)SantosBrasil
  2. 2.Centro de Estudos do MarUniversidade Federal do ParanáPontal do ParanáBrasil
  3. 3.Biological SciencesUniversity of WindsorWindsorCanada

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