Marine Biodiversity

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 223–228 | Cite as

A deep-water crinoid Leptometra celtica bed off the Portuguese south coast

  • Paulo Fonseca
  • Fátima Abrantes
  • Ricardo Aguilar
  • Aida Campos
  • Marina Cunha
  • Daniel Ferreira
  • Teresa P. Fonseca
  • Silvia García
  • Victor Henriques
  • Margarida Machado
  • Ariadna Mechó
  • Paulo Relvas
  • Clara F. Rodrigues
  • Emília Salgueiro
  • Rui Vieira
  • Adrian Weetman
  • Margarida Castro
SHORT COMMUNICATION

Abstract

The existence of a wide bed of the crinoid Leptometra celtica (M’Andrew and Barrett 1857), at approximately 500 m depth, off the Portuguese south coast is inferred from remotely operated vehicle (ROV) transects carried out as part of a research project (IMPACT) aimed at evaluating the impact of bottom trawling on the burrowing crustacean Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) fishing grounds. The crinoid bed is located in an enclave of gravelly sand surrounded by muddy sediments, the latter constituting the typical habitat of Norway lobster. An overall description of the geological and oceanographic features off the Portuguese southern coast is presented, highlighting the complexity of factors influencing the research zone. A delimitation of the crinoid bed and a comparison of taxa richness for the epibenthic megafauna of the adjacent towed zone are carried out. This finding highlights the urgent need for a comprehensive mapping programme to allow for the identification and preservation of sensitive habitats within the scope of the European Union Habitats and Marine Strategy Framework Directives.

Keywords

Crinoid bed Leptometra celtica Deepwater benthic habitats ROV transects South Portugal 

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Copyright information

© Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paulo Fonseca
    • 1
  • Fátima Abrantes
    • 1
  • Ricardo Aguilar
    • 2
  • Aida Campos
    • 1
  • Marina Cunha
    • 3
  • Daniel Ferreira
    • 1
  • Teresa P. Fonseca
    • 1
  • Silvia García
    • 2
  • Victor Henriques
    • 1
  • Margarida Machado
    • 4
  • Ariadna Mechó
    • 5
  • Paulo Relvas
    • 4
  • Clara F. Rodrigues
    • 3
  • Emília Salgueiro
    • 1
  • Rui Vieira
    • 3
  • Adrian Weetman
    • 6
  • Margarida Castro
    • 4
  1. 1.Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA)LisbonPortugal
  2. 2.OCEANAMadridSpain
  3. 3.Departamento de Biologia & CESAMUniversidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de SantiagoAveiroPortugal
  4. 4.Centro de Ciências do Mar (CCMAR)Universidade do Algarve, GambelasFaroPortugal
  5. 5.Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM)Passeig Marítim de la BarcelonetaBarcelonaSpain
  6. 6.Marine LaboratoryMarine Scotland Science (MSS)AberdeenUK

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