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Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 604–610 | Cite as

Cellular Automata Based Model of Urban Spatial Growth

  • Sandeep MaithaniEmail author
Research Article

Abstract

In the study reported in this paper an attempt has been made to develop a Cellular Automata (CA) model for simulating future urban growth of an Indian city. In the model remote sensing data and GIS were used to provide the empirical data about urban growth while Markov chain process was used to predict the amount of land required for future urban use based on the empirical data. Multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) technique was used to reveal the relationships between future urban growth potential and site attributes of a site. Finally using the CA model, land for future urban development was spatially allocated based on the urban suitability image provided by MCE, neighbourhood information of a site and the amount of land predicted by Markov chain process. The model results were evaluated using Kappa Coefficient and future urban growth was simulated using the calibrated model

Keywords

Spatial urban growth Cellular Automata Multi-criteria evaluation GIS Kappa coefficient 

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Copyright information

© Indian Society of Remote Sensing 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Human Settlement Analysis DivisionIndian Institute of Remote SensingDehradunIndia

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