World Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 76–79

Maternal obesity associated with inflammation in their children

  • Karen L. Leibowitz
  • Reneé H. Moore
  • Rexford S. Ahima
  • Albert J. Stunkard
  • Virginia A. Stallings
  • Robert I. Berkowitz
  • Jesse L. Chittams
  • Myles S. Faith
  • Nicolas Stettler
Brief Report

Abstract

Background

This study explored the association between maternal obesity during pregnancy and the inflammatory markers, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and the cytokine, adiponectin, in the offspring.

Methods

Weight, height, Tanner stage and biomarkers were measured in thirty-four 12-year-old children, from the Infant Growth Study, who were divided into high risk (HR) and low risk (LR) groups based on maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI).

Results

The two groups differed markedly in their hs-CRP levels, but no group difference was found for the other three biomarkers. The odds ratio (OR) of HR children having detectable hs-CRP levels was 16 times greater than that of LR children after adjusting for confounding variables, including BMI z-score, Tanner stages and gender (OR: 16; 95% CI: 2–123).

Conclusions

These results suggest that maternal obesity during pregnancy is associated with later development of elevated hs-CRP in the offspring, even after controlling for weight.

Key words

children hs-C-reactive protein inflammation maternal obesity 

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Copyright information

© Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen L. Leibowitz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Reneé H. Moore
    • 3
  • Rexford S. Ahima
    • 3
  • Albert J. Stunkard
    • 3
  • Virginia A. Stallings
    • 1
  • Robert I. Berkowitz
    • 1
  • Jesse L. Chittams
    • 3
  • Myles S. Faith
    • 1
    • 3
  • Nicolas Stettler
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.The Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew BrunswickUSA
  3. 3.University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology and NutritionUMDNJ-RWJMSNew BrunswickUSA

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