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Geotechnical properties of a transparent glass sand saturated with a blend of mineral oils

  • Zhen Zhang
  • Qiang Xu
  • Jianfeng ChenEmail author
  • Jianfeng Xue
  • Penghui Guo
Original Paper

Abstract

A new type of transparent sand composed of a fused quartz sand (i.e., glass sand) and the mixture of two white mineral oils is introduced as a material for geotechnical visualized model tests in this paper. The glass sand has the refractive index identical to that of the mixture of two white mineral oils as pore fluid. The transparent sand possesses significant advantages in transparency. In interior natural lighting environment, the transparent sand has a clear visible depth of 14 cm and a maximum visible depth of 20 cm. It also has advantages in non-toxicity and stable nature. Laboratory tests including direct shear, one-dimensional compression, compaction, consolidation-drained triaxial and permeability tests were conducted to demonstrate physical, mechanical, and permeability properties of the transparent sand agree with those of natural sands. As a comparison and reference for the further study, the main properties of available water-saturated fused quartz and transparent sands by other researchers were also summarized in this paper. The transparent sand described here can be broadly applied in visualized model tests in geotechnical and geological engineering fields.

Keywords

Transparent sand Transparency Visualized model tests Laboratory tests 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The support from State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection under grant no. SKLGP2015K005 and National Natural Science Foundation of China under grant no.41772289 is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Saudi Society for Geosciences 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhen Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qiang Xu
    • 2
  • Jianfeng Chen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jianfeng Xue
    • 3
  • Penghui Guo
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Geotechnical Engineering, School of Civil EngineeringTongji UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment ProtectionChengduChina
  3. 3.School of Engineering and ITUniversity of New South WalesCanberraAustralia
  4. 4.CCCC First Highway Consultants Co., LtdXi’anChina

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