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Pulmonary valve infective endocarditis with atrial septal defect and pulmonary valve disease—too coincidental to be true?

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In this case we describe a 68-year-old male patient who presented with malaise after being treated for a urinary tract infection caused by enterococcus faecalis. The electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation and subsequent transthoracic echocardiography revealed a mobile structure on the pulmonary valve with an increased transpulmonary valve gradient (Fig. 1). Blood cultures were positive for enterococcus faecalis and PET-CT revealed F‑18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the right ventricular outflow tract and lungs.

Fig. 1
figure1

TTE showing a mobile structure on the pulmonary valve. TT transthoracic echocardiography

Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a previously unknown small atrial septal defect type 2 with left-to-right shunt as well as a moderate pulmonary valve stenosis and severe regurgitation (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2
figure2

TEE showing thickened pulmonary valve and atrial septal defect. TEE transoesophageal echocardiography

In the majority of cases, right-sided infective endocarditis involves the tricuspid valve and is associated with intravenous drug use or the presence of pacemakers [1,2,3]. In this case, a type 2 atrial septal defect and a dysplastic pulmonary valve were observed. This case underscores the importance of thorough investigation of coexistent congenital heart defects in cases of right-sided infective endocarditis [4].

References

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    Vereckei A, Vándor L, Halász J, et al. Infective endocarditis resulting in rupture of sinus of Valsalva with a rupture site communicating with both the right atrium and right ventricle. J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2004;17(9):995–7.

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    Moss R, Munt B. Injection drug use and right sided endocarditis. Heart. 2003;89(5):577–81.

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    Yuan SM. Right-sided infective endocarditis: recent epidemiologic changes. Int J Clin Exp Med. 2014;7(1):199–218.

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    Das CK, Ete T, Dorjee R, et al. Atrial septal defect with pulmonary valve endocarditis—an unusual friendship. MOJ Clin Med Case Rep. 2017;6(2):42–3.

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Correspondence to P. T. G. Bot.

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Smits, M.W.L., Tukkie, R., Meregalli, P.G. et al. Pulmonary valve infective endocarditis with atrial septal defect and pulmonary valve disease—too coincidental to be true?. Neth Heart J (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12471-020-01369-2

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