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Journal of Plant Biology

, Volume 52, Issue 3, pp 251–258 | Cite as

Assessment of Gene Flow from Genetically Modified Anthracnose-Resistant Chili Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) to a Conventional Crop

  • Chang-Gi Kim
  • Dae In Kim
  • Hyo-Jeong Kim
  • Ji Eun Park
  • Bumkyu Lee
  • Kee Woong Park
  • Soon-Chun Jeong
  • Kyung Hwa Choi
  • Joo Hee An
  • Kang-Hyun Cho
  • Young Soon Kim
  • Hwan Mook KimEmail author
ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Abstract

We conducted a 2-year field assessment of the gene flow from genetically modified (GM) chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), containing the PepEST (pepper esterase) gene, to a non-GM control line “WT512” and two commercial hybrid cultivars, “Manidda” and “Cheongpung Myeongwol (CM).” After seeds were collected from the pollen-recipient non-GM plants, hybrids between them and the GM peppers were screened by a hygromycin assay. PCR with the targeting hpt gene was performed to confirm the presence of transgenes in hygromycin-resistant seedlings. Out of 7,071 “WT512” seeds and 6,854 “Manidda” seeds collected in 2006, eight and 12 hybrids, respectively, were detected. In 2007, 33 hybrids from 3,456 “WT512” seeds and 50 hybrids from 3,457 “CM” seeds were found. The highest frequency of gene flow, 6.19%, was observed in that 2007 trial. These results suggest that a limited isolation distance would be sufficient to prevent gene flow from GM to conventionally bred chili peppers.

Keywords

Capsicum annuum Chili pepper Gene flow Genetically modified (GM) crop 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. H.T. Kim at the Chungbuk National University for providing seeds of “Cheongpung Myeongwol.” This research was supported by grants from the KRIBB Research Initiative Program and the Crop Functional Genomics Center.

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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Korea 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chang-Gi Kim
    • 1
  • Dae In Kim
    • 1
  • Hyo-Jeong Kim
    • 1
  • Ji Eun Park
    • 1
  • Bumkyu Lee
    • 2
  • Kee Woong Park
    • 1
  • Soon-Chun Jeong
    • 1
  • Kyung Hwa Choi
    • 1
  • Joo Hee An
    • 3
  • Kang-Hyun Cho
    • 3
  • Young Soon Kim
    • 4
  • Hwan Mook Kim
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Bio-Evaluation CenterKRIBBCheongwon-gunRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Biosafety DivisionNational Academy of Agricultural Science, RDASuwonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesInha UniversityIncheonRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Agricultural Plant Stress Research CenterChonnam National UniversityGwangjuRepublic of Korea

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