Geoheritage

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 317–327 | Cite as

Using Active Fault Studies for Raising Public Awareness and Sensitisation on Seismic Hazard: A Case Study from Lesvos Petrified Forest Geopark, NE Aegean Sea, Greece

  • Nickolas Zouros
  • Spyros Pavlides
  • Nikolaos Soulakellis
  • Alexandros Chatzipetros
  • Katerina Vasileiadou
  • Ilias Valiakos
  • Konstantina Mpentana
Original Article

Abstract

Seismic hazard is commonly assessed by using seismicity records and local geotechnical conditions. It is however important to accurately define the probable seismic sources of the broader study area and assess their seismic potential, as earthquake intensities are expected to increase in the close vicinity of active faults. Although onshore faults are considered more hazardous, due to their immediate proximity to inhabited areas, the offshore fault hazard is considerable too, due to their proximity to the islands. In this paper, the identified seismically active faults are used as main elements of an educational programme in the Lesvos Petrified Forest Geopark to raise public awareness and sensitivity on seismic hazard.

Keywords

Seismic hazard Active faults Awareness Educational programme Lesvos Greece 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nickolas Zouros
    • 1
  • Spyros Pavlides
    • 2
  • Nikolaos Soulakellis
    • 1
  • Alexandros Chatzipetros
    • 3
  • Katerina Vasileiadou
    • 4
  • Ilias Valiakos
    • 4
  • Konstantina Mpentana
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of the AegeanMytileneGreece
  2. 2.Department of GeologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.Department of GeologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  4. 4.Natural History Museum of the Lesvos Petrified ForestLesvosGreece

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