Advertisement

International Journal of Social Robotics

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 371–381 | Cite as

Maggie: A Social Robot as a Gaming Platform

  • V. Gonzalez-PachecoEmail author
  • Arnaud Ramey
  • F. Alonso-Martin
  • A. Castro-Gonzalez
  • Miguel A. Salichs
Article

Abstract

Edutainment robots are robots designed to participate in people’s education and in their entertainment. One of the tasks of edutainment robots is to play with their human partners, but most of them offer a limited pool of games. Moreover, it is difficult to add new games to them. This lack of flexibility could shorten their life cycle. This paper presents a social robot on which several robotic games have been developed. Our robot uses a flexible and modular architecture that allows the creation of new skills by the composition of existing and simpler skills. With this architecture, the development of a new game mainly consists in the composition of the skills that are needed for this specific game. In this paper, we present the robot, its hardware and its software architecture, including its interaction capabilities. We also provide a detailed description of the development of five of the games the robot can play.

Keywords

Social robots Edutainment Robot games Robot entertainment Human–robot interaction 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Barber R, Salichs MA (2002) A new human based architecture for intelligent autonomous robots. Amsterdam, Elsevier, pp 85–90 Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bay H, Ess A, Tuytelaars T, Van Gool L (2008) Speeded-up robust features (surf). Comput Vis Image Underst 110:346–359 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cook AM, Meng MQH, Gu JJ, Howery K (2002) Development of a robotic device for facilitating learning by children who have severe disabilities. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 10(3):178–187 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Corrales A, Salichs MA (2009) Integration of a rfid system in a social robot. In: Kim J-H, Ge SS, Vadakkepat P, Jesse N, Al Manum A, Puthusserypady KS, Rückert U, Sitte J, Witkowski U, Nakatsu R, Braunl T, Baltes J, Anderson J, Wong C-C, Verner I, Ahlgren D (eds) Progress in robotics. Communications in computer and information science, vol 44. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 63–73 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Dubuisson M-P, Jain AK (1994) A modified hausdorff distance for object matching. In: Pattern recognition. Conference A: computer vision image processing, proceedings of the 12th IAPR international conference on, October 1994, vol 1, pp 566–568 Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Goddeau D, Pineau J (2000) Fast reinforcement learning of dialog strategies. IEEE Press, New York Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kozima H, Nakagawa C, Yasuda Y (2005) Interactive robots for communication-care: a case-study in autism therapy. In: ROMAN 2005. IEEE international workshop on robot and human interactive communication. IEEE Press, New York, pp 341–346 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Lathan C, Vice JM, Tracey M, Plaisant C, Druin A, Edward K, Montemayor J (2001) Therapeutic play with a storytelling robot, Number fig. 1. ACM Press, New York Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lee WP, Kuo JW, Lai PC (2008) Building Adaptive Emotion-Based Pet Robots. In: Ao SI, Gelman L, Hukins DWL, Hunter A, Korsunsky AM (eds) Proceedings of the world congress on engineering, London, UK, vol I. Newswood, Hong Kong, pp 85–90 Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Leite I, Pereira A, Martinho C, Paiva A (2008) Are emotional robots more fun to play with. In: RO-MAN 2008—The 17th IEEE international symposium on robot and human interactive communication, August 2008. IEEE Press, New York, pp 77–82 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lowe DG (2004) Distinctive image features from scale-invariant keypoints. Int J Comput Vis 60:91–110 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Michaud F, Caron S (2002) Roball, the rolling robot. Auton Robots 12(2):211–222 zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Nyberg E, Mitamura T, Placeway P, Duggan M, San Francisco (2002) DialogXML: extending VoiceXML for dynamic dialog management. In: Proceedings of the second international conference on human language technology research, pp 298–302. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Plaisant C, Druin A, Lathan C, Dakhane K, Edwards K, Vice JM, Montemayor J (2000) A storytelling robot for pediatric rehabilitation. In: Proceedings of the fourth international ACM conference on assistive technologies—Assets ’00, New York, USA, November 2000. ACM Press, New York, pp 50–55 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ramey A, González-Pacheco V, Salichs MA (2011) Integration of a low-cost rgb-d sensor in a social robot for gesture recognition. In: Proceedings of the 6th international conference on human-robot interaction, HRI ’11, New York, NY, USA, 2011. ACM Press, New York, pp 229–230 Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Rivas R (2007) Robot skill abstraction for ad architecture. Intell Auton Vehicles 47(4):12–13. 6th IFAC Symposium Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Robins B, Dautenhahn K (2004) Interacting with robots: can we encourage social interaction skills in children with autism? Access Comput 80:6–10 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Robins B, Ferrari E, Dautenhahn K (2008) Developing scenarios for robot assisted play. In: RO-MAN 2008, the 17th IEEE international symposium on robot and human interactive communication, Munich, August 2008. IEEE Press, New York, pp 180–186 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Salichs M, Barber R, Khamis A, Malfaz M, Gorostiza J, Pacheco R, Rivas R, Rrales A, Delgado E, Garcia D (2006) Maggie: a robotic platform for human-robot social interaction. In: 2006 IEEE conference on robotics automation and mechatronics, pp 1–7 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Viola P, Jones M (2001) Rapid object detection using a boosted cascade of simple features. In: Proceedings of the 2001 IEEE computer society conference on computer vision and pattern recognition. CVPR 2001, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, April 2001, vol 1. IEEE Comput. Soc., Los Alamitos, pp I-511–I-518. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Williams JD, Young S (2007) Scaling POMDPs for spoken dialog management. IEEE Trans Audio Speech Lang Process 15(7):2116–2129 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Xin M, Sharlin E (2007) In: Playing games with robots–a method for evaluating human-robot interaction, Number September. Itech Education and Publishing, Vienna, pp 469–480. Chap. 26 Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Yorita A, Hashimoto T, Kobayashi H, Kubota N (2009) Remote education based on robot edutainment. In: Kim J-H, Ge SS, Vadakkepat P, Jesse N, Al Manum A, Puthusserypady KS, Rückert U, Sitte J, Witkowski U, Nakatsu R, Braunl T, Baltes J, Anderson J, Wong C-C, Verner I, Ahlgren D (eds) Progress in robotics. Communications in computer and information science, vol 44. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 204–213 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media BV 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Gonzalez-Pacheco
    • 1
    Email author
  • Arnaud Ramey
    • 1
  • F. Alonso-Martin
    • 1
  • A. Castro-Gonzalez
    • 1
  • Miguel A. Salichs
    • 1
  1. 1.Systems Engineering and Automation DepartmentUniversity Carlos III of MadridMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations