International Journal of Social Robotics

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 167–186 | Cite as

Reliable People Detection Using Range and Intensity Data from Multiple Layers of Laser Range Finders on a Mobile Robot

  • Alexander Carballo
  • Akihisa Ohya
  • Shin’ichi Yuta
Article

Abstract

Reliable people detection is an important task in several areas like security, intelligent environments and human robot interaction. People detection does not depend only upon separation of static environment objects from those showing motion (hopefully humans), a reliable system should be able to detect static people even in cluttered environments.

This work presents a reliable approach for people detection and position estimation using multiple layers of Laser Range Finders (LRF) on a mobile robot. Each layer combines two LRF sensors to scan around the robot’s surroundings and are vertically separated to detect distinct parts of the human body. By using AdaBoost we create strong classifiers to detect body parts, candidate segments in each layer are fused for people detection, and we use simple data association to estimate their positions. Additionally, this work introduces laser reflection intensity as a novel property for people detection. First, we present a study of laser intensity and textiles, then introduce new intensity-based features for detection, and propose a method for segment separation using laser intensity. We provide a thorough evaluation of our multi-layered system though several experiments on a mobile robot.

Keywords

Multi-layered laser range finder Laser reflection intensity People detection AdaBoost Sensor fusion 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media BV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Carballo
    • 1
  • Akihisa Ohya
    • 1
  • Shin’ichi Yuta
    • 1
  1. 1.Intelligent Robot LaboratoryGraduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of TsukubaTsukuba CityJapan

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