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Sugar Tech

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 366–371 | Cite as

Alternative Sweeteners Production from Sugarcane in India: Lump Sugar (Jaggery)

  • Jaswant Singh
  • R. D. Singh
  • S. I. Anwar
  • S. Solomon
Review Article

Abstract

Importance of sweeteners has long been recognized in Indian diets. Sweetness and flavour are very important as regards consumers’ acceptability. The sugar and jaggery are the main sweetening agents which are added to beverages and foods for increasing palatability. Over the years, food habits of human beings have been greatly influenced by research and developmental activities and also due to their health consciousness. Despite witnessing pressure of industrialization, the jaggery industry has flourished in different states of the country viz; Uttar Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh. The increasing trend of their production is of much significance to learn about peoples’ liking towards jaggery in rural areas mainly due to it’s nutritional and medicinal values. About 25-30% of sugarcane produced in the country is utilized for production of jaggery and khandsari and this industry serves as very important means of subsistence and livelihood for masses. The technology and equipment for production of quality jaggery and its value added products have been developed. Due to its nutritional and medicinal values, the jaggery has great export potential in the world.

Keywords

Jaggery Nutritional Medicinal Furnace Clarificants Storage 

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Copyright information

© Society for Sugar Research & Promotion 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaswant Singh
    • 1
  • R. D. Singh
    • 1
  • S. I. Anwar
    • 1
  • S. Solomon
    • 1
  1. 1.Indian Institute of Sugarcane ResearchLucknowIndia

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