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Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 82–87 | Cite as

A rare case of acute pancreatitis caused by Candida Albicans

  • Kazuhiro Tange
  • Tomoyuki Yokota
  • Kotaro Sunago
  • Michiko Aono
  • Hironori Ochi
  • Shunji Takechi
  • Toshie Mashiba
  • Akira Iino Hida
  • Yumi Oshiro
  • Kouji Joko
  • Teru KumagiEmail author
  • Yoichi Hiasa
Case Report
  • 84 Downloads

Abstract

We experienced a rare case of acute pancreatitis caused by Candida infection. A 52-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. Blood tests revealed high amylase and hepatobiliary enzyme abnormalities, and the patient was hospitalized for acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography showed a 15-mm space-occupying lesion at the parenchyma of the pancreatic head. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed after conservative treatment, which revealed a cystic lesion with a suspected solid component inside involving both lower bile duct and pancreatic duct. Cytology of collected bile and pancreatic juice revealed innumerous hyphae and spores morphologically consistent with Candida spp., as did endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor site. Empiric therapy with oral fluconazole resulted in reduction of the space-occupying lesion 3 months after discharge. However, acute pancreatitis recurred about 1 year and 6 months after discharge. After conservative treatment was carried out again, the same lesion was fenestrated by endoscopic sphincteroplasty, and its internal solid components were resected using a basket catheter. Pathological analysis confirmed the presence of fungus balls and degenerated substances. Candida Albicans was identified by fungal culture examination. After the excretion of the fungus balls, pancreatitis did not recur thereafter during outpatient follow-up.

Keywords

Acute pancreatitis Fungus ball Candida Albicans 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Kazuhiro Tange, Tomoyuki, Yokota, Kotaro Sunago, Michiko Aono, Hironori Ochi, Shunji Takechi, Toshie Mashiba, Akira I. Hida, Yumi Ohshiro, Koji Joko, Teru Kumagi, Yoichi Hiasa declare that we have no conflict of interest.

Research involving human and/or animal rights

This study does not include any data about human subjects.

Informed consent

This case report does not involve human subjects and does not apply to giving informed consent.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Gastroenterology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhiro Tange
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomoyuki Yokota
    • 2
  • Kotaro Sunago
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michiko Aono
    • 2
  • Hironori Ochi
    • 2
  • Shunji Takechi
    • 2
  • Toshie Mashiba
    • 2
  • Akira Iino Hida
    • 3
  • Yumi Oshiro
    • 3
  • Kouji Joko
    • 2
  • Teru Kumagi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yoichi Hiasa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology and MetabologyEhime University Graduate School of MedicineToonJapan
  2. 2.Department of Center for Liver and Biliary and Pancreatic DiseasesMatsuyama Red Cross HospitalMatsuyamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of PathologyMatsuyama Red Cross HospitalMatsuyamaJapan

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