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Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 501–506 | Cite as

A successful treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma with Osler–Rendu–Weber disease using radiofrequency ablation under laparoscopy

  • Yoshinari Takaoka
  • Naoki Morimoto
  • Kouichi Miura
  • Hiroaki Nomoto
  • Kozue Murayama
  • Takuya Hirosawa
  • Shunji Watanabe
  • Takeshi Fujieda
  • Mamiko Ttsukui
  • Hirotoshi Kawata
  • Toshiro Niki
  • Norio Isoda
  • Makoto Iijima
  • Hironori Yamamoto
Case Report
  • 80 Downloads

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be difficult to diagnose and treat in patients with Osler–Rendu–Weber disease due to vascular malformation and regenerative nodular hyperplasia. In addition, percutaneous liver puncture should be avoided for the diagnosis and treatment as the procedure carries a high risk of bleeding. We herein report the successful treatment of HCC in a patient with Osler–Rendu–Weber disease using radiofrequency ablation (RFA) under laparoscopy. A 71-year-old man with Osler–Rendu–Weber disease was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of HCC. He also had chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The arterioportal shunts in the liver were detected by computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A tumor 20 mm in size was detected as a defected-lesion in the hepatic segment IV during the portal phase by CT. RFA under laparoscopy was performed for the curative treatment for HCC, with sufficient ablation obtained. Although the blood gushed out from the needle tract at the end of the procedure, complete hemostasis was achieved promptly using coagulation forceps. The post-operative course was favorable. Thus, laparoscopic RFA is a useful treatment modality for HCC in patients with Osler–Rendu–Weber disease, as a hemostasis device can be used with direct visualization.

Keywords

Osler–Rendu–Weber disease Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Hepatocellular carcinoma Radiofrequency ablation Laparoscopy 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Research involving human participants

All procedures followed have been performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from the patient for being included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Gastroenterology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshinari Takaoka
    • 1
  • Naoki Morimoto
    • 1
  • Kouichi Miura
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Nomoto
    • 1
  • Kozue Murayama
    • 1
  • Takuya Hirosawa
    • 1
  • Shunji Watanabe
    • 1
  • Takeshi Fujieda
    • 1
  • Mamiko Ttsukui
    • 1
  • Hirotoshi Kawata
    • 2
  • Toshiro Niki
    • 2
  • Norio Isoda
    • 1
  • Makoto Iijima
    • 3
  • Hironori Yamamoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Gastroenterology, Department of MedicineJichi Medical University School of MedicineShimotsukeJapan
  2. 2.Department of Diagnostic PathologyJichi Medical University School of MedicineShimotsukeJapan
  3. 3.Department of GastroenterologyDokkyo Medical UniversityTochigiJapan

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