Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 37–40 | Cite as

Gossypiboma with bleeding from fistula to the colon observed by colonoscopy

  • Naoyuki Nishimura
  • Motowo Mizuno
  • Yuichi Shimodate
  • Akira Doi
  • Hirokazu Mouri
  • Kazuhiro Matsueda
  • Hiroshi Yamamoto
Case Report

Abstract

A gossypiboma is a mass of cotton sponge left in the body postoperatively. Here, we report a case of gossypiboma with bleeding through a fistula to the colon, which became clinically evident 24 years after gynecological surgery, and resembled a bleeding diverticulum at colonoscopy. A 67-year-old woman presented with anemia and hematochezia. She had undergone a hysterectomy for myoma uteri 24 years earlier. Colonoscopy showed a deep depressed lesion mimicking a diverticulum with bleeding in the transverse colon. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography was interpreted as revealing a 6-cm thick-walled tumor, containing an air bubble, and a fistula between the mass and the transverse colon. The patient underwent laparotomy, with the preoperative expectation that the mass was a penetrating submucosal tumor. Pathological findings revealed denatured cotton tissues surrounded by reactive tissues to the foreign body. Despite its rarity, gossypiboma should be considered in patients with an intra-abdominal mass who have a history of laparotomy. Gossypiboma can cause fistula to the colon and bleeding. Imaging studies and the clinical course may mimic a malignant tumor.

Keywords

Gossypiboma Fistula Bleeding Colonoscopy 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Gastroenterology 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naoyuki Nishimura
    • 1
  • Motowo Mizuno
    • 1
  • Yuichi Shimodate
    • 1
  • Akira Doi
    • 1
  • Hirokazu Mouri
    • 1
  • Kazuhiro Matsueda
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Yamamoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology and HepatologyKurashiki Central HospitalKurashikiJapan

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