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A Relative Cost of Control Analysis of Once-Weekly Semaglutide Versus Exenatide Extended-Release and Dulaglutide for Bringing Patients to HbA1c and Weight Loss Treatment Targets in the USA

  • Pierre Johansen
  • Barnaby HuntEmail author
  • Neeraj N. Iyer
  • Tam Dang-Tan
  • Richard F. Pollock
Original Research
  • 61 Downloads

Abstract

Introduction

The SUSTAIN 3 and 7 clinical trials compared the efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide relative to exenatide extended-release (ER) and dulaglutide, respectively, in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The trials included a series of clinically relevant single and composite endpoints focused on improving glycemic control and reducing body weight, while avoiding hypoglycemia. The present study combined SUSTAIN 3 and 7 outcomes with short-term treatment costs to evaluate the relative cost of control of once-weekly semaglutide versus exenatide ER and dulaglutide.

Methods

Proportions of patients reaching three endpoints were taken from SUSTAIN 3 and 7 for comparisons with exenatide ER and dulaglutide, respectively. The endpoints investigated were HbA1c < 7.0%, HbA1c < 7.0% without hypoglycemia or weight gain, and a ≥ 1.0% HbA1c reduction with ≥ 5.0% weight loss. Annual per patient treatment costs were based on US wholesale acquisition costs from July 2018. Relative cost of control was calculated by plotting the ratio of the treatment costs and the ratio of the proportions of patients reaching each endpoint on the cost–efficacy plane.

Results

Once-weekly semaglutide 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg were most effective at bringing patients to each of the three endpoints across both SUSTAIN trials. The efficacy-to-cost ratios for once-weekly semaglutide 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg were also superior to all comparators when assessing both the single endpoint of HbA1c < 7.0% and the two composite endpoints including weight loss and hypoglycemia.

Conclusions

The present study showed that once-weekly semaglutide 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg offer superior cost of control versus exenatide ER and dulaglutide in terms of achieving single and composite endpoints, based on an analysis of retrieved dropout data. Once-weekly semaglutide 0.5 mg and 1.0 mg would therefore represent good value for money in the USA, particularly in the attainment of multi-model T2D treatment goals.

Funding

Novo Nordisk A/S.

Keywords

Costs and cost analysis Diabetes mellitus Glucagon-like peptides Type 2 United States 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Funding

Sponsorship and article processing charges for this study were funded by Novo Nordisk A/S. All authors had full access to all of the data in this study and take complete responsibility for the integrity of the data and accuracy of the data analysis.

Medical Writing and/or Editorial Assistance

The authors would like to thank Samuel Malkin at Ossian Health Economics and Communications GmbH for medical writing assistance (funded by Novo Nordisk A/S).

Authorship

All named authors meet the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) criteria for authorship for this manuscript, take responsibility for the integrity of the work as a whole, and have given final approval to the version to be published.

Disclosures

Pierre Johansen is an employee of Novo Nordisk A/S. Neeraj N. Iyer is an employee of Novo Nordisk Inc. Tam Dang-Tan is an employee of Novo Nordisk Inc. Barnaby Hunt is an employee of Ossian Health Economics and Communication GmbH, which received a consulting fee from Novo Nordisk A/S to support the study. Richard Pollock is an employee of Ossian Health Economics and Communication GmbH, which received a consulting fee from Novo Nordisk A/S to support the study.

Compliance with Ethics Guidelines

This article does not contain any new studies of human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Data Availability

All data generated or analyzed during this study are included in this published article.

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Copyright information

© Springer Healthcare Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Novo Nordisk A/SSøborgDenmark
  2. 2.Ossian Health Economics and Communications GmbHBaselSwitzerland
  3. 3.Novo Nordisk IncPlainsboroUSA

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