The Cerebellum

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 151–177

Consensus Paper: The Cerebellum's Role in Movement and Cognition

  • Leonard F. Koziol
  • Deborah Budding
  • Nancy Andreasen
  • Stefano D’Arrigo
  • Sara Bulgheroni
  • Hiroshi Imamizu
  • Masao Ito
  • Mario Manto
  • Cherie Marvel
  • Krystal Parker
  • Giovanni Pezzulo
  • Narender Ramnani
  • Daria Riva
  • Jeremy Schmahmann
  • Larry Vandervert
  • Tadashi Yamazaki
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s12311-013-0511-x

Cite this article as:
Koziol, L.F., Budding, D., Andreasen, N. et al. Cerebellum (2014) 13: 151. doi:10.1007/s12311-013-0511-x

Abstract

While the cerebellum's role in motor function is well recognized, the nature of its concurrent role in cognitive function remains considerably less clear. The current consensus paper gathers diverse views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum across a range of cognitive and emotional functions. This paper considers the cerebellum in relation to neurocognitive development, language function, working memory, executive function, and the development of cerebellar internal control models and reflects upon some of the ways in which better understanding the cerebellum's status as a “supervised learning machine” can enrich our ability to understand human function and adaptation. As all contributors agree that the cerebellum plays a role in cognition, there is also an agreement that this conclusion remains highly inferential. Many conclusions about the role of the cerebellum in cognition originate from applying known information about cerebellar contributions to the coordination and quality of movement. These inferences are based on the uniformity of the cerebellum's compositional infrastructure and its apparent modular organization. There is considerable support for this view, based upon observations of patients with pathology within the cerebellum.

Keywords

Cerebellum Cognitive Neurodevelopment Cognition Movement Motor Language Executive Function 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard F. Koziol
    • 1
  • Deborah Budding
    • 1
  • Nancy Andreasen
    • 1
  • Stefano D’Arrigo
    • 3
  • Sara Bulgheroni
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Imamizu
    • 5
    • 6
  • Masao Ito
    • 1
  • Mario Manto
    • 4
  • Cherie Marvel
    • 1
  • Krystal Parker
    • 1
  • Giovanni Pezzulo
    • 1
  • Narender Ramnani
    • 2
  • Daria Riva
    • 3
  • Jeremy Schmahmann
    • 1
  • Larry Vandervert
    • 1
  • Tadashi Yamazaki
    • 7
  1. 1.ChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Royal Holloway, University of LondonEghamUK
  3. 3.Developmental Neurology DivisionFondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C. BestaMilanoItaly
  4. 4.FNRS ULBBruxellesBelgium
  5. 5.Cognitive Mechanism LaboratoriesAdvanced Telecommunication Research Institute InternationalSoraku, KyotoJapan
  6. 6.Center for Information and Neural NetworksNational Institute of Information and Communications Technology and Osaka UniversitySuitaJapan
  7. 7.The University of Electro-CommunicationsTokyoJapan

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