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International Journal of Material Forming

, Volume 1, Supplement 1, pp 1203–1206 | Cite as

Multi-Step toolpath approach to overcome forming limitations in single point incremental forming

  • J. VerbertEmail author
  • B. Belkassem
  • C. Henrard
  • A. M. Habraken
  • J. Gu
  • H. Sol
  • B. Lauwers
  • J. R. Duflou
Symposium MS17: Incremental forming

Abstract

Although Incremental Forming offers distinct advantages over traditional forming processes, such as short lead times and low setup costs, the process still has some drawbacks. Besides the obtainable accuracy, one of the main challenges of the process are the process limits. Many workpiece geometries cannot be manufactured due to the fact that the maximum wall angle that can be formed is limited for a certain sheet material and thickness to a given angle. Different solutions to this approach have been proposed and this paper further investigates one of those solutions, the multi step approach for single point incremental forming. Experiments were performed and compared with simulations to better understand the phenomena underlying the improved process performance.

Key words

SPIF Incremental forming Process limits 

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Copyright information

© Springer/ESAFORM 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Verbert
    • 1
    Email author
  • B. Belkassem
    • 2
  • C. Henrard
    • 3
  • A. M. Habraken
    • 3
  • J. Gu
    • 2
  • H. Sol
    • 2
  • B. Lauwers
    • 1
  • J. R. Duflou
    • 1
  1. 1.Katholieke Universiteit LeuvenDepartment of Mechanical EngineeringLeuven
  2. 2.Vrije Universiteit BrusselVakgroep Mechanica van Materialen en ConstructiesBrussels
  3. 3.Université de LiègeDépartement M&S Mécanique des matériaux et StructuresLiège

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