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Breast Cancer

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 343–356 | Cite as

The Japanese Breast Cancer Society clinical practice guidelines for epidemiology and prevention of breast cancer, 2015 edition

  • Naruto TairaEmail author
  • Masami Arai
  • Masahiko Ikeda
  • Motoki Iwasaki
  • Hitoshi Okamura
  • Kiyoshi Takamatsu
  • Tsunehisa Nomura
  • Seiichiro Yamamoto
  • Yoshinori Ito
  • Hirofumi Mukai
Special Feature Japanese Breast Cancer Society Guidelines 2015

Introduction

In the 2015 edition of Clinical Practice Guideline of Breast Cancer, evidence grades were used as indexes for definite causal relationships, in accordance with the 2013 edition, but recommendation grades were used for clinical questions (CQs) on prevention and risk assessment. The major revisions to the 2015 edition were as follows.
  • In the section entitled “Risk factors for breast cancer” in the 2013 edition, a decrease in breast cancer risk due to obesity in premenopausal women was determined to be probable. However, a large-scale pooled analysis in Japanese women reported in 2014 showed a significant increase in breast cancer risk in premenopausal women with a high body mass index. Due to this report, the description has been changed to “obesity may increase the risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women” in the 2015 edition. Body mass in Asian women might have opposite effects on breast cancer compared to that in Western women.

  • In the section entitled “Risk assessment...

Keywords

Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Risk Mammographic Density National Comprehensive Cancer Network Japanese Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was sponsored by The Japan Breast Cancer Society. We thank the clinical practice guidelines committee and clinical practice guidelines assessment committee for their support of this work.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Naruto Taira received a research grant from Astra Zeneca; Masami Arai has no conflict of interest; Masahiko Ikeda received lecture fees from Chugai; Motoki Iwasaki has no conflict of interest; Hitoshi Okamura has no conflict of interest; Kiyoshi Takamatsu has no conflict of interest; Tsunehisa Nomura has no conflict of interest; Seiichiro Yamamoto has no conflict of interest; Yoshinori Ito received manuscript fees from Chugai, Eisai and Novartis, and received research funding from Novartis, Chugai, Parexel, Eisai, Sanofi, Taiho, EPS, Dai-ichi-sankyo, and Boehringer-ingelheim; Hirofumi Mukai has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Breast Cancer Society 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naruto Taira
    • 1
    Email author
  • Masami Arai
    • 2
  • Masahiko Ikeda
    • 3
  • Motoki Iwasaki
    • 4
  • Hitoshi Okamura
    • 5
  • Kiyoshi Takamatsu
    • 6
  • Tsunehisa Nomura
    • 7
  • Seiichiro Yamamoto
    • 8
  • Yoshinori Ito
    • 9
  • Hirofumi Mukai
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Breast and Endocrine SurgeryOkayama University HospitalOkayamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Genetic OncologyThe Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer ResearchTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Breast and Thyroid SurgeryFukuyama City HospitalHiroshimaJapan
  4. 4.Division of Epidemiology, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and ScreeningNational Cancer CenterTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Department of Psychosocial Rehabilitation, Institute of Biomedical and Health SciencesHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan
  6. 6.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyTokyo Dental College Ichikawa General HospitalChibaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Breast and Thyroid SurgeryKawasaki Medical School HospitalOkayamaJapan
  8. 8.Public Health Policy Research Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and ScreeningNational Cancer CenterTokyoJapan
  9. 9.Department of Breast Medical OncologyThe Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer ResearchTokyoJapan
  10. 10.Department of Oncology/HematologyNational Cancer Center Hospital EastChibaJapan

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