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Breast Cancer

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 861–868 | Cite as

A Japanese prospective multi-institutional feasibility study on accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial brachytherapy: clinical results with a median follow-up of 26 months

  • Takayuki NoseEmail author
  • Yuki Otani
  • Shuuji Asahi
  • Iwao Tsukiyama
  • Takushi Dokiya
  • Toshiaki Saeki
  • Ichirou Fukuda
  • Hiroshi Sekine
  • Naoto Shikama
  • Yu Kumazaki
  • Takao Takahashi
  • Ken Yoshida
  • Tadayuki Kotsuma
  • Norikazu Masuda
  • Eisaku Yoden
  • Kazutaka Nakashima
  • Taisei Matsumura
  • Shino Nakagawa
  • Seiji Tachiiri
  • Yoshio Moriguchi
  • Jun Itami
  • Masahiko Oguchi
Original Article

Abstract

Background

A Japanese prospective multi-institutional feasibility study on accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial brachytherapy was performed. The first clinical results were reported with a median follow-up of 26 months.

Patients and methods

Forty-six female breast cancer patients with positive hormone receptors and tumors ≤3 cm, pN0M0, completed the protocol treatment. After breast-conserving surgery and histological confirmation of negative surgical margins and pN0, brachytherapy applicators were implanted either postoperatively (n = 45) or intraoperatively (n = 1). High-dose-rate brachytherapy of 36 Gy/6 fractions was delivered. All clinical data were prospectively collected using case report forms and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver.3.0.

Results

At the median follow-up of 26 months, no breast cancer recurrence of any type was observed. Sequelae ≥G2 were dermatitis (G2, 7 %), fibrosis (G2, 11 %; G3, 4 %), fracture (G2, 2 %), pain (G2, 7 %; G3, 2 %), and soft tissue necrosis (G2, 6 %). Cosmetic outcomes evaluated by excellent/good scores were 100 % at pre-therapy (n = 46), 94 % at 12 months (n = 46), and 81 % at 24 months (n = 36), respectively.

Conclusions

Disease control and sequelae were satisfactory due to the strict eligibility and protocol-defined treatment parameters. The cosmetic outcomes were comparable to those of previous Japanese breast-conserving therapy series.

Keywords

Accelerated partial breast irradiation Breast cancer Radiotherapy Brachytherapy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Cancer Research from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of the Government of Japan (17-10 and 21-8-2) and also by the Project for Development of Innovative Research on Cancer Therapeutics (P-DIRECT) from the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Breast Cancer Society 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takayuki Nose
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yuki Otani
    • 2
  • Shuuji Asahi
    • 3
  • Iwao Tsukiyama
    • 4
  • Takushi Dokiya
    • 5
  • Toshiaki Saeki
    • 6
  • Ichirou Fukuda
    • 5
  • Hiroshi Sekine
    • 5
  • Naoto Shikama
    • 5
  • Yu Kumazaki
    • 5
  • Takao Takahashi
    • 6
  • Ken Yoshida
    • 7
  • Tadayuki Kotsuma
    • 7
  • Norikazu Masuda
    • 8
  • Eisaku Yoden
    • 9
  • Kazutaka Nakashima
    • 10
  • Taisei Matsumura
    • 11
  • Shino Nakagawa
    • 12
  • Seiji Tachiiri
    • 13
  • Yoshio Moriguchi
    • 14
  • Jun Itami
    • 15
  • Masahiko Oguchi
    • 16
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyNippon Medical School Tama Nagayama HospitalTamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyKaizuka City HospitalKaizukaJapan
  3. 3.Departments of SurgeryAidu Chuo HospitalAiduwakamatsuJapan
  4. 4.Departments of RadiologyAidu Chuo HospitalAiduwakamatsuJapan
  5. 5.Departments of Radiation Oncology, International Medical CenterSaitama Medical UniversityHidakaJapan
  6. 6.Departments of Breast Oncology, International Medical CenterSaitama Medical UniversityHidakaJapan
  7. 7.Departments of Radiation OncologyNational Hospital Organization Osaka National HospitalOsakaJapan
  8. 8.Departments of Surgery, Breast OncologyNational Hospital Organization Osaka National HospitalOsakaJapan
  9. 9.Departments of Radiation OncologyKawasaki Medical SchoolKurashikiJapan
  10. 10.Departments of SurgeryKawasaki Medical SchoolKurashikiJapan
  11. 11.Departments of RadiologyNational Hospital Organization, National Kyushu Medical CenterFukuokaJapan
  12. 12.Departments of SurgeryNational Hospital Organization National Kyushu Medical CenterFukuokaJapan
  13. 13.Departments of Radiation OncologyKyoto City HospitalKyotoJapan
  14. 14.Departments of Breast SurgeryKyoto City HospitalKyotoJapan
  15. 15.Department of Radiation OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  16. 16.Department of Radiation OncologyCancer Institute Hospital, The Japanese Foundation for Cancer ResearchTokyoJapan

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