The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 50, Issue 2, pp 207–217

Molecular analysis of spatial variation of iron-reducing bacteria in riverine alluvial aquifers of the Mankyeong River

  • So-Jeong Kim
  • Dong-Chan Koh
  • Soo-Je Park
  • In-Tae Cha
  • Joong-Wook Park
  • Jong-Hwa Na
  • Yul Roh
  • Kyung-Seok Ko
  • Kangjoo Kim
  • Sung-Keun Rhee
Articles

DOI: 10.1007/s12275-012-1342-z

Cite this article as:
Kim, SJ., Koh, DC., Park, SJ. et al. J Microbiol. (2012) 50: 207. doi:10.1007/s12275-012-1342-z

Abstract

Alluvial aquifers are one of the mainwater resources in many countries. Iron reduction in alluvial aquifers is often a major anaerobic process involved in bioremediation or causing problems, including the release of As trapped in Fe(III) oxide. We investigated the distribution of potential iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) in riverine alluvial aquifers (B1, B3, and B6 sites) at the Mankyeong River, Republic of Korea. Inactive iron reduction zones, the diversity and abundance of IRB can be examined using a clone library and quantitative PCR analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Geobacter spp. are potential IRB in the iron-reducing zone at the B6 (9 m) site, where high Fe(II) and arsenic (As) concentrations were observed. At the B3 (16 m) site, where low iron reduction activity was predicted, a dominant clone (10.6%) was 99% identical in 16S rRNA gene sequence with Rhodoferax ferrireducens. Although a major clone belonging to Clostridium spp. was found, possible IRB candidates could not be unambiguously determined at the B1 (18 m) site. Acanonical correspondence analysis demonstrated that, among potential IRB, only the Geobacteraceae were well correlated with Fe(II) and As concentrations. Our results indicate high environmental heterogeneity, and thus high spatial variability, in thedistribution of potential IRB in the riverine alluvial aquifersnear the Mankyeong River.

Keywords

iron reduction riverineaquifer arsenic Geobacter spp. Rhodoferax ferrireducens 

Supplementary material

12275_2012_1342_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (145 kb)
Supplementary material, approximately 145 KB.

Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • So-Jeong Kim
    • 1
  • Dong-Chan Koh
    • 2
  • Soo-Je Park
    • 1
  • In-Tae Cha
    • 1
  • Joong-Wook Park
    • 3
  • Jong-Hwa Na
    • 4
  • Yul Roh
    • 5
  • Kyung-Seok Ko
    • 2
  • Kangjoo Kim
    • 6
  • Sung-Keun Rhee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyChungbuk National UniversityCheongjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.KoreaInstitute of Geoscience and Mineral ResourcesDaejeonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Biotechnology Center for Agriculture and the Environment, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA
  4. 4.Department of Information & StatisticsChungbuk National UniversityCheongjuRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Faculty of Earth Systems and Environmental SciencesChonnam National UniversityGwangjuRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.School of Civil and Environmental EngineeringKunsan National UniversityJeonbukRepublic of Korea

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