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The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 49, Issue 1, pp 66–70 | Cite as

Production of Anti-Helicobacter pylori metabolite by the lichen-Forming fungus Nephromopsis pallescens

  • Heng Luo
  • Yoshikazu Yamamoto
  • Hae-Sook Jeon
  • Yan Peng Liu
  • Jae Sung Jung
  • Young Jin Koh
  • Jae-Seoun HurEmail author
Articles

Abstract

The present study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial activity of lichen-forming fungi (LFF) against Helicobacter pylori, and to optimize the culture conditions of LFF for maximum production of natural antibiotics against H. pylori. To accomplish this, a screening assay was first conducted among 19 species of LFF. The extract of Nephromopsis pallescens (KOLRI-040516) exhibited the strongest anti-ff. pylori activity. Bioautograghic TLC and HPLC analysis identified usnic acid as the main antibacterial substance produced by JV. pallescens. The growth of JV. pallescens and production of antibacterial substances produced by the fungus were then investigated under several culture conditions including the culture media, initial medium pHs, incubation temperatures, and the degree of aeration. The results indicated that culture in MY medium with an initial pH of 6.0, a temperature of 15°C and a low degree of aeration supported the largest usnic acid production of the fungus (16.4 ug usnic acid/g dry biomass). Especially, aeration was found to be an important factor that affect both growth and usnic acid production of N. pallescens.

Keywords

Nephromopsis pallescens anti-Helicobacter pylori activity usnic acid culture conditions Nephromopsis pallescens anti-Helicobacter pylori activity usnic acid culture conditions 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heng Luo
    • 1
  • Yoshikazu Yamamoto
    • 2
  • Hae-Sook Jeon
    • 1
  • Yan Peng Liu
    • 1
  • Jae Sung Jung
    • 1
  • Young Jin Koh
    • 1
  • Jae-Seoun Hur
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Korean Lichen Research InstituteSunchon National UniversitySunchonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Biological Production, Faculty of Bioresource SciencesAkita Prefectural UniversityAkitaJapan

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