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The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 49, Issue 1, pp 24–28 | Cite as

Halomonas alkalitolerans sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacteriun isolated from soda meadow saline soil in Daqing, China

  • Shuang Wang
  • Qian Yang
  • Zhi-Hua Liu
  • Lei Sun
  • Dan Wei
  • Jun-Zheng Zhang
  • Jin-Zhu Song
  • Yun Wang
  • Jia Song
  • Jin-Xia Fan
  • Xian-Xin Meng
  • Wei Zhang
Articles

Abstract

A moderately halophilic bacterial strain 15-13T, which was isolated from soda meadow saline soil in Daqing City, Heilongjiang Province, China, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The cells of strain 15–13 were found to be Gram-negative, rod-shaped, and motile. The required growth conditions for strain 15–13T were: 1–23% NaCl (optimum, 7%), 10–50°C (optimum, 35°C), and pH 7.0–11.0 (optimum, pH 9.5). The predominant cellular fatty acids were C18:1 ω7c (60.48%) and C16:0 (13.96%). The DNA G+C content was 67.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated that strain 15–13T clustered within a branch comprising species of the genus Halomonas. The closest phylogenetic neighbor of strain 15–13T was Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661T (98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolated strain and H pantelleriensis DSM 9661T was 33.8%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain 15–13T represents a novel species of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas alkalitolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain for this novel species is 15–13T (=CGMCC 1.9129T =NBRC 106539T).

Keywords

Halomonas alkalitolerans sp. nov. 16S rRNA gene sequence fatty acid composition DNA-DNA hybridization 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuang Wang
    • 1
  • Qian Yang
    • 1
  • Zhi-Hua Liu
    • 1
  • Lei Sun
    • 2
  • Dan Wei
    • 2
  • Jun-Zheng Zhang
    • 1
  • Jin-Zhu Song
    • 1
  • Yun Wang
    • 1
  • Jia Song
    • 1
  • Jin-Xia Fan
    • 1
  • Xian-Xin Meng
    • 2
  • Wei Zhang
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life Science and EngineeringHarbin Institute of echnologyHarbinP. R. China
  2. 2.Soil Fertilizer and Environment Energy Institute of Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural SciencesHarbinP. R. China

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