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The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 48, Issue 3, pp 290–296 | Cite as

Kinetic evaluation of products inhibition to succinic acid producers Escherichia coli NZN111, AFP111, BL21, and Actinobacillus succinogenes 130ZT

  • Qiang Li
  • Dan Wang
  • Yong Wu
  • Maohua Yang
  • Wangliang Li
  • Jianmin XingEmail author
  • Zhiguo Su
Articles

Abstract

Succinic acid is one of the platform compounds and its production via natural feedstocks has drawn worldwide concerns. To evaluate the inhibitory effects of fermentation products on the growth of Actinobacillus succinogenes 130ZT and Escherichia coli NZN111, AFP111, BL21, fermentations with addition of individual products in medium were carried out. The cell growth was inhibited when the concentrations of formate, acetate, lactate, and succinate were at range of 8.8–17.6 g/L, 10–40 g/L, 9–18 g/L, and 10–80 g/L, respectively. For these two species of bacteria, E. coli was more resistant to acid products than A. succinogenes, while both endured succinate rather than by-products. As a result of end product inhibition, succinate production yield by A. succinogenes decreased from 1.11 to 0.49 g/g glucose. Logistic and Monod mathematical models were presented to simulate the inhibition kinetics. The Logistic model was found more suitable for describing the overall synergistic inhibitory effects.

Keywords

A. succinogenes E. coli fermentation inhibition kinetics 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qiang Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dan Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong Wu
    • 2
    • 3
  • Maohua Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wangliang Li
    • 1
  • Jianmin Xing
    • 1
    Email author
  • Zhiguo Su
    • 1
  1. 1.National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process EngineeringChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP. R. China
  2. 2.Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP. R. China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process EngineeringChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP. R. China

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