The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 47, Issue 6, pp 699–704 | Cite as

Paenibacillus pini sp. nov., a cellulolytic bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of pine tree

  • Byung-Chun Kim
  • Kang Hyun Lee
  • Mi Na Kim
  • Eun-Mi Kim
  • Sung Ran Min
  • Hyun Soon Kim
  • Kee-Sun Shin
Articles

Abstract

Strain S22T, a novel cellulolytic bacterium was isolated from the rhizosphere of pine trees. This isolate was Gram-reaction positive, motile and rods, and formed terminal or subterminal ellipsoidal spores. S22T represented positive activity for catalase, oxidase, esterase (C4), esterase lipase (C8), β-galactosidase, leucine arylamidase, and hydrolysis of esculin. It contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic dia-mino acid in the cell-wall. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7), and the major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 (52.9%), iso-Ci16:0 (11.3%), and iso-C15:0 (10.0%). The DNA G+C content was 43.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this isolate belonged to the family Paenibacillaceae. S22T exhibited less than 97.0% 16S rRNA gene similarity with all relative type strains in the genus Paenibacillus, and the most closely related strains were Paenibacillus anaericanus MH21T and Paenibacillus ginsengisoli Gsoil 1638T, with equal similarities of 95.8%. This polyphasic evidence suggested that strain S22T should be considered a novel species in the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name, Paenibacillus pini sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is S22T (=KCTC 13694T =KACC 14198T =JCM 16418T)

Keywords

Paenibacillus pini cellulose pine tree rhizosphere 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Byung-Chun Kim
    • 1
  • Kang Hyun Lee
    • 1
  • Mi Na Kim
    • 1
  • Eun-Mi Kim
    • 1
  • Sung Ran Min
    • 2
  • Hyun Soon Kim
    • 2
  • Kee-Sun Shin
    • 1
  1. 1.Biological Resources CenterKRIBBDaejeonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Plant Genomics Research CenterKRIBBDaejeonRepublic of Korea

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