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The Journal of Microbiology

, 47:28 | Cite as

Incidence of Wolbachia and Cardinium endosymbionts in the Osmia community in Korea

  • Gilsang Jeong
  • Kyeongyong Lee
  • Jiyoung Choi
  • Seokjo Hwang
  • Byeongdo Park
  • Wontae Kim
  • Youngcheol Choi
  • Ingyun Park
  • Jonggill KimEmail author
Article

Abstract

Sex ratio distorting endosymbionts induce reproductive anomalies in their arthropod hosts. They have recently been paid much attention as firstly texts of evolution of host-symbiont relationships and secondly potential biological control agents to control arthropod pests. Among such organisms, Wolbachia and Cardinium bacteria are well characterized. This study aims at probing such bacteria in the Osmia community to evaluate their potential utilization to control arthropod pests. Among 17 PCR tested species, Osmia cornifrons and a parasitic fly are infected with Wolbachia and a mite species is infected with Cardinium. Phylogenetic tree analyses suggest that horizontal transfer of the bacteria occurred between phylogenetically distant hosts.

Keywords

Wolbachia Cardinium sex ratio distortion biological control phylogenetic analyses 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelber GmbH 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilsang Jeong
    • 1
  • Kyeongyong Lee
    • 2
  • Jiyoung Choi
    • 1
  • Seokjo Hwang
    • 1
  • Byeongdo Park
    • 1
  • Wontae Kim
    • 1
  • Youngcheol Choi
    • 1
  • Ingyun Park
    • 2
  • Jonggill Kim
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of Environmental Entomology, Department of Agricultural BiologyNational Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development AdministrationSuwonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Laboratory of Pollinating Insect, Department of Agricultural BiologyNational Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development AdministrationSuwonRepublic of Korea

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