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The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 494–497 | Cite as

Genotypic characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae isolates from pediatric pneumonia patients in Chengdu city, Sichuan, China

  • Guozhong Tian
  • Li Zhang
  • Machao Li
  • Xiaolei Wang
  • Yuhong Zheng
  • Xiaojing Li
  • Cheng Huang
  • Xuechun Li
  • Yongqiong Xie
  • Li Xu
  • Hongyu Ren
  • Zhujun Shao
Articles

Abstract

Two hundred and seventy-three Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from pediatric pneumonia patients in China were studied. We used Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) to analyze genotypic characteristics. All strains were biotyped and serotyped. Relatedness and patterns of genes among isolates were determined by the analysis of MLST and eBURST. H. influenzae primarily causes acute pneumonia in children under 1 year old. Nontypeable H. influenzae was responsible for most cases of pediatric pneumonia. All 273 strains were classified into eight biotypes. They mostly belonged to the I, II, and III biotypes (17.6%, 43.6%, and 22.7%, respectively). 62 strains (22.7%) produced b-lactamase. We found 28 novel alleles. Fifty different STs were found by MLST, of which 39 were novel. These were ST477 through ST508 and ST521 through ST527. Group 17 and predicted founders 503 were new groups in this study. No STs correlated with strains from Korea, which is adjacent to China. The H. influenzae strains from China appeared to have heterogeneous ST types patterns which may be the reason no outbreaks or epidemics of H. influenzae infections have occurred in Chengdu city, Sichuan, China.

Keywords

Haemophilus influenzae multilocus sequence typing biotyping serotyping 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guozhong Tian
    • 1
  • Li Zhang
    • 2
  • Machao Li
    • 1
  • Xiaolei Wang
    • 2
  • Yuhong Zheng
    • 1
  • Xiaojing Li
    • 2
  • Cheng Huang
    • 2
  • Xuechun Li
    • 2
  • Yongqiong Xie
    • 2
  • Li Xu
    • 1
  • Hongyu Ren
    • 1
  • Zhujun Shao
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Infectious Diseases Control and Prevention, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and PreventionChinese Center for Diseases Control and PreventionBeijingP. R. China
  2. 2.Chengdu Children HospitalChengdu CityP. R. China

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