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The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 46, Issue 6, pp 737–743 | Cite as

Protective effect of polygoni cuspidati radix and emodin on Vibrio vulnificus cytotoxicity and infection

  • Jong Ro Kim
  • Dool-Ri Oh
  • Mi Hye Cha
  • Byoung Sik Pyo
  • Joon Haeng Rhee
  • Hyon E. Choy
  • Won Keun Oh
  • Young Ran Kim
Article

Abstract

Vibrio vulnificus, a good model organism of bacterial septicemia, causes fatal septicemia manifesting a fulminating course and a high mortality rate within days. In order to identify new natural substances preventing V. vulnificus infection, a plant library was screened for inhibiting cytotoxicity to host cells by using Trypan blue staining and LDH assay. We found that Polygoni Cuspidati Radix potently suppressed the acute death of HeLa and RAW264.7 cells in a dose dependent manner. Further studies revealed that Polygoni Cuspidati Radix inhibited V. vulnificus growth and survival in HI broth and seawater, respectively. We confirmed that Polygoni Cuspidati Radix contained high level of emodin by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Emodin showed direct antibacterial activity against V. vulnificus. In addition, emodin prevented the morphologic damages and acute death of HeLa cells caused from V. vulnificus. The safety of Polygoni Cuspidati Radix and emodin to host cells was confirmed by MTT assay. Polygoni Cuspidati Radix and emodin protected mice from V. vulnificus infection.

Keywords

V. vulnificus infection emodin Polygoni Cuspidati Radix cytotoxicity antibacterial activity 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelber GmbH 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jong Ro Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dool-Ri Oh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mi Hye Cha
    • 1
    • 2
  • Byoung Sik Pyo
    • 1
  • Joon Haeng Rhee
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Hyon E. Choy
    • 2
    • 4
  • Won Keun Oh
    • 5
  • Young Ran Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Oriental Medicine MaterialsDongshin UniversityJeonnamRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Clinical Vaccine R&D CenterChonnam National University Medical SchoolGwangjuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.National Research Laboratory of Molecular Microbial PathogenesisChonnam National University Medical SchoolGwangjuRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Research Institute of Vibrio Infection and Genome Research Center for Enteropathogenic BacteriaChonnam National University Medical SchoolGwangjuRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.College of PharmacyChosun UniversityGwangjuRepublic of Korea

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