The Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 47, Issue 1, pp 1–8

Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress-free acidification

  • Allen Kuan-Liang Chen
  • Cristy Gelling
  • Peter L. Rogers
  • Ian W. Dawes
  • Bettina Rosche
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12275-008-0167-2

Cite this article as:
Chen, A.KL., Gelling, C., Rogers, P.L. et al. J Microbiol. (2009) 47: 1. doi:10.1007/s12275-008-0167-2

Abstract

Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch culture revealed that more than 829 genes were regulated in response to an environmental shift from pH 6 to pH 3 by added sulfuric acid. This shift in pH was not detrimental to the rate of growth compared to a control culture that was maintained at pH 6 and the transcriptional changes most strikingly implicated not up- but down-regulation of stress responses. In addition, the transcriptional changes upon acid addition indicated remodeling of the cell wall and central carbon metabolish. The overall trend of changes was similar for the pH-shift experiment and the pH 6 control. However, the changes in the pH 6 control were much weaker and occurred 2.5 h later than in the pH-shift experiment. Thus, the reaction to the steep pH decrease was an immediate response within the normal repertoire of adaptation shown in later stages of fermentation at pH 6. Artificially preventing the yeast from acidifying the medium may be considered physiologically stressful under the tested conditions.

Keywords

stress response Saccharomyces cerevisiae acidification fermentation pyruvate decarboxylase 

Supplementary material

12275_2008_167_MOESM1_ESM.txt (141 kb)
Appendix (txt 140 KB)

Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelber GmbH 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allen Kuan-Liang Chen
    • 1
  • Cristy Gelling
    • 1
  • Peter L. Rogers
    • 1
  • Ian W. Dawes
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bettina Rosche
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Ramaciotti Centre for Gene Function AnalysisUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Bioprocessing Technology Institute, Agency for ScienceTechnology and Research (A*STAR)SingaporeSingapore

Personalised recommendations