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Pedestrian-level wind environment near a super-tall building with unconventional configurations in a regular urban area

  • Xuelin Zhang
  • A. U. WeerasuriyaEmail author
  • Bin Lu
  • K. T. TseEmail author
  • Chun Ho Liu
  • Yukio Tamura
Research Article
  • 27 Downloads

Abstract

Unconventional configurations of tall buildings are noticeably different from their counterpart of traditional building designs but nevertheless, the unconventional configurations have often been adopted for tall buildings without their impact on the pedestrian-level wind environment (PLWE) fully understood. To fill the existing knowledge gap, this study investigates the PLWE near a 400 m super-tall building with various conventional and unconventional configurations in a regular urban area. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted for three incident wind directions (θ = 0°, 22.5°, and 45°) to investigate mean wind speed at the pedestrian level using the three-dimensional (3D), steady-state, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) technique. The results reveal 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in maximum wind speed in the urban area after the construction of a super-tall building. The magnitude of the maximum wind speed and areas with high and low wind speeds in the PLWE, however, significantly vary with building design and incident wind direction. The configurations with sharp corners, large plan aspect ratios and frontal areas and the orientation consistently show a strong dependency on incident wind direction except the one with rounded plan shapes. The location of building openings and direction of building inclination are two other factors that modify the PLWE in an urban area. Moreover, the projected width of the super-tall building at a height slightly above the roof level of surrounding buildings is critical for estimating the areas of high and low wind speed at the pedestrian level.

Keywords

pedestrian-level wind environment super-tall building building configuration computational fluid dynamics simulation 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The work described in this paper was supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. 16207118) and the General Research Fund (GRF) of Hong Kong Research Grants Council (RGC) HKU 1725616.

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Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringThe Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyKowloon, Hong KongChina
  2. 2.Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built EnvironmentEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical Engineering, 7/F Haking Wong BuildingThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  4. 4.School of Civil EngineeringChongqing UniversityChongqingChina

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