Building Simulation

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 33–40 | Cite as

An hp-finite element method for simulating indoor contaminant dispersion

Research Article / Indoor/Outdoor Airflow and Air Quality

Abstract

An hp-adaptive finite element method (FEM) is coupled with a Lagrangian particle transport technique to simulate contaminant dispersion within building interiors, including aircraft cabins. The hp-adaptation follows a three-step adaptation strategy, in which the mesh size and shape function order are dynamically controlled. An a posterior error estimator based on the L 2 norm calculation is used in the adaptation procedure. Interior flow fields are constructed from the hp-adaptive FEM. Contaminant dispersion is simulated using a random walk/stochastic approach based on a general probability distribution for depicting diffusion. Simulation results for 2- and 3-D interiors are presented.

Keywords

hp-adaptive FEM contaminant transport indoor dispersion simulation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Axley JW (1989). Multi-zone dispersal analysis by element assembly. Building and Environment, 24: 113–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Demkowicz L (2007). Computing with hp-Adaptive Finite Elements, Vol. 1, One and Two Dimensional Elliptic and Maxwell Problems. London: Chapman and Hall/CRC.MATHGoogle Scholar
  3. Demkowicz L, Kurtz J, Pardo D, Paszynski M, Rachowicz W, Zdunek A (2008). Computing with hp-Adaptive Finite Elements, Vol. 2, Frontiers: Three Dimensional Elliptic and Maxwell Problems with Applications. London: Chapman and Hall/CRC.Google Scholar
  4. Karniadakis GEM, Sherwin SJ (1999). Spectral/hp Element Methods for CFD. Oxford: Oxford University Press.MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. Lin CH, Dunn KH, Horstman RH, Topmiller JL, Ahlers MF, Bennett JS, Sedgwick LM, Wirogo S (2005a). Numerical simulation of airflow and airborne pathogen transport in aircraft cabins—Part I: Numerical simulation of the flow field. ASHRAE Transactions, 111(1): 755–763.Google Scholar
  6. Lin CH, Dunn KH, Horstman RH, Topmiller JL, Ahlers MF, Bennett JS, Sedgwick LM, Wirogo S (2005b). Numerical simulation of airflow and airborne pathogen transport in aircraft cabins—Part II: Numerical simulation of airborne pathogen transport. ASHRAE Transactions, 111(1): 764–768.Google Scholar
  7. Murakami S, Kato S, Suyama Y (1987). Three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent airflow in a ventilated room by means of a two equation model. ASHRAE Transactions, 93(2): 621–642.Google Scholar
  8. Nielsen PV (1974). Flow in air conditioned room. PhD Dissertation, Technical University of Denmark.Google Scholar
  9. Nithiarasu P (2008). A unified fractional step method for compressible and incompressible flows, heat transfer and incompressible solid mechanics. Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, 18: 111–130.CrossRefMATHMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  10. Pepper DW (2006). Chapter 7 Meshless methods. In: Minkowycz WJ, Sparrow EM, Murthy JY (eds), Handbook of Numerical Heat Transfer, 2nd Edn. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  11. Pepper DW, Carrington DB (2009). Modeling Indoor Air Pollution. London: Imperial College Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Runchal AK (1980). A random walk atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain and meteorological conditions. Paper presented at the 2nd AMS Joint Conference of Air Pollution Meteorology, New Orleans, USA.Google Scholar
  13. Wang X, Pepper DW (2007). hp-adaptive finite element simulations of viscous flow including convective heat transfer. Numerical Heat Transfer, Part B: Fundamentals, 51: 491–513.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Wang X, Pepper DW (2009). Benchmarking COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5a. Special Report, COMSOL Inc.Google Scholar
  15. Yang J, Li X, Zhao B (2004). Prediction of transient contaminant dispersion and ventilation performance using the concept of accessibility. Energy and Buildings, 36: 293–299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Zheng C, Bennett GD (2002). Applied Contaminant Transport Modeling, 2nd Edn. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  17. Zienkiewicz OC, Taylor RL, Nithiarasu P (2005a). The Finite Element Method for Fluid Mechanics, 6th Edn. Oxford: Elsevier.Google Scholar
  18. Zienkiewicz OC, Taylor RL, Zhu JZ (2005b). The Finite Element Method: Its Basis and Fundamentals, 6th Edn. Oxford: Elsevier.MATHGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NCACM, Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Nevada Las VegasLas VegasUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringPurdue University CalumetHammondUSA

Personalised recommendations