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Building Simulation

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 25–35 | Cite as

Predictive simulation-based lighting and shading systems control in buildings

  • Ardeshir Mahdavi
Research Article

Abstract

This paper presents a prototypically implemented daylight-responsive lighting and shading systems control in buildings that makes use of real-time sensing and lighting simulation. This system can control the position of window blinds and the status of the luminaires. It operates as follows: (1) at regular time intervals, the system considers a set of candidate control states for the subsequent time step; (2) these alternatives are then virtually enacted via a lighting simulation application that receives input data from a self-updating model of sky (luminance distribution maps obtained via calibrated digital photography), room, and occupancy; (3) the simulation results are compared and ranked according to the preferences (objective function) specified by the occupants and/or facility manager to identify the candidate control state with the most desirable performance.

Keywords

simulation lighting shading control sky luminance mapping calibration 

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Copyright information

© Tsinghua Press and Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Building Physics and Building EcologyVienna University of TechnologyViennaAustria

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