Advertisement

Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 250–257 | Cite as

Moisturizing effect of serine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles and polysaccharide-rich extract of root Phragmites communis incorporated in hydrogel bases

  • Sonia Barua
  • Hyeongmin Kim
  • Seong-Chul Hong
  • Seung-Yup Yoo
  • Dohyun Shin
  • Chung-Lyol Lee
  • Seon-Jeong Na
  • Yeong Hyo Kim
  • Kanghee Jo
  • Gyiae Yun
  • Joong-Hark Kim
  • Uy Dong Sohn
  • Jaehwi LeeEmail author
Research Article

Abstract

This study evaluated the moisturizing effect of serine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (serine-SLN) and polysaccharide-rich reed (Phragmites communis) root extract (RRE) incorporated in hydrogel bases. The hydrogels with serine-SLN and/or RRE were carefully applied on the volar forearm of human volunteers. Their moisturizing efficacy was evaluated by monitoring conductance values using a skin surface hygrometer. The values of the area under the normalized conductance-time curve (AUCC) were developed and compared as a parameter for the water holding capacity of the skin. Hydrogels with serine-SLN did not significantly moisturize the skin, while hydrogel containing 0.25% RRE produced a significant increase in the moisture content of the skin. However, adding more than 0.25% of RRE into the hydrogel base decreased the moisturizing effect due to the marked reduction of viscosity. Significantly enhanced moisturizing effect was observed with the hydrogel containing 0.25% RRE and 3% serine-SLN, with AUCC increased 2.21 times compared to than blank hydrogel. The results imply that effective delivery of serine into the skin is possible using lipid-based nanocarriers and RRE, which could be a promising strategy to moisturize the skin effectively.

Keywords

Phragmites rhizoma Reed root extract Serine Solid lipid nanoparticles Skin moisturization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a grant of the Korean Health Technology R&D Project, Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (Grant No. HN13C0073). This research was supported by Chung-Ang University Research Scholarship Grants in 2015.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

References

  1. Colin X, Verdu J (2006) Polymer degradation during processing. C R Chim 9:1380–1395CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Desai P, Patlolla RR, Singh M (2010) Interaction of nanoparticles and cell-penetrating peptides with skin for transdermal drug delivery. Mol Membr Biol 27:247–259CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Eros I, Szuts J (1985) Investigation of consistence of ointments of suspension Type, part III: relations among the results of the different investigating methods. Gyogyszeresze 29:369–373Google Scholar
  4. Garg A, Aggarwal D, Garg S, Singla AK (2002) Spreading of semisolid formulations. J Pharm Technol 26:84–105Google Scholar
  5. Harding CR, Watkinson A, Rawlings AV, Scott IR (2000) Dry skin, moisturization and corneodesmolysis. Int J Cosmet Sci 22:21–52CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Jenning V, Schäfer-Korting M, Gohla S (2000) Vitamin A-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for topical use: drug release properties. J Control Release 66:115–126CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Katagiri C, Sato J, Nomura J, Denda M (2003) Changes in environmental humidity affect the water-holding property of the stratum corneum and its free amino acid content, and the expression of filaggrin in the epidermis of hairless mice. J Dermatol Sci 31:29–35CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Kim H, Ro J, Barua S, Hwang DS, Na SJ, Lee HS, Jeong JH, Woo S, Kim H, Hong B, Yun G, Kim JH, Yoon YH, Park MG, Kim J, Sohn UD, Lee J (2015) Combined skin moisturization of liposomal serine incorporated in hydrogels prepared with carbopol ETD 2020, rhesperse RM 100 and hyaluronic acid. Korean J Physiol Pharmacol 19:543–547CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  9. Mahouche-chergui S, Grohens Y, Balnois E, Lebeau B, Scudeller Y (2014) Adhesion of silica particles on thin polymer films model of flax cell wall. Mater Sci Appl 5:953–965Google Scholar
  10. Müller RH, Radtke M, Wissing SA (2002) Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) in cosmetic and dermatological preparations. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 54:S131–S155CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Nam Y, Chung YH, Chu LY, Lee HS, Park ES, Hwang KW, Kim DS, Kim HD, Je HD, Shin YK, Jeong JH (2013) Inhibitory effects of polysaccharide-rich extract of Phragmites rhizoma on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Life Sci 92:866–872CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Pena LE (1990) Gel dosage forms: theory, formulation, and processing. In: Osborne DW, Amann AH (eds) Topical drug delivery formulations. Marcel Dekker, New York, pp 381–388Google Scholar
  13. Rawlings AV, Scott IR, Harding CR, Bowsert PA (1994) Stratrum corneum moisturization at the molecular level. J Investig Dermatol 103:731–741CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Silva LE, Rodrigues V, Schulman MA, Ferelli C, Gimenis JM, Ruas GW, Baby AR, Velasco MVR, Taqueda ME, Kaneko TM (2009) Hydrating effects of moisturizer active compounds incorporated into hydrogels: in vivo assessment and comparison between devices. J Cosmet Dermatol 8:32–39CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Souto E, Muller R (2008) Cosmetic features and applications of lipid nanoparticles (SLN, NLC). Int J Cosmet Sci 30:157–165CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Uner M, Wissing SA, Yener G, Muller RH (2005) Skin moisturizing effect and skin penetration of ascorbyl palmitate entrapped in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) incorporated into hydrogel. Pharmazie 60:751–755PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Verdier-Sévrains S, Bonté F (2007) Skin hydration: a review on its molecular mechanisms. J Cosmet Dermatol 6:75–82CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Wang S, Kislalioglu M, Breuer M (1999) The effect of rheological properties of experimental moisturizing creams/lotions on their efficacy and perceptual attributes. Int J Cosmet Sci 21:167–188CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Zhou XM, Idler WW, Steven AC, Roop DR, Steinert PM (1988) The complete sequence of the human intermediate filament chain keratin 10. Subdomainal divisions and model for folding of end domain sequences. J Biol Chem 263:15584–15589PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonia Barua
    • 1
  • Hyeongmin Kim
    • 1
  • Seong-Chul Hong
    • 1
  • Seung-Yup Yoo
    • 1
  • Dohyun Shin
    • 1
  • Chung-Lyol Lee
    • 1
  • Seon-Jeong Na
    • 1
  • Yeong Hyo Kim
    • 1
  • Kanghee Jo
    • 1
  • Gyiae Yun
    • 2
  • Joong-Hark Kim
    • 3
  • Uy Dong Sohn
    • 1
  • Jaehwi Lee
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.College of PharmacyChung-Ang UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food Science and TechnologyChung-Ang UniversityAnseongRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Erom Co., Ltd.ChuncheonRepublic of Korea

Personalised recommendations