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Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 539–547 | Cite as

Caffeic acid regulates LPS-induced NF-κB activation through NIK/IKK and c-Src/ERK signaling pathways in endothelial cells

  • So Ra Kim
  • Yu Ri Jung
  • Dae Hyun Kim
  • Hye Jin An
  • Mi Kyung Kim
  • Nam Deuk Kim
  • Hae Young Chung
Research Article

Abstract

The redox sensitive, proinflammatory nuclear transcription factor NF-κB plays a key role in inflammation. In a redox state disrupted by oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory genes are upregulated by the activation of NF-κB via diverse kinases. Thus, the search and characterization of new substances that modulate NF-κB are topics of considerable research interest. Caffeic acid is a component of garlic, some fruits, and coffee, and is widely used as a phenolic agent in beverages. In the present study, caffeic acid was examined with respect to the modulation of inflammatory NF-κB activation via the redox-related c-Src/ERK and NIK/IKK pathways via the reduction of oxidative stress. YPEN-1 cells (an endothelial cell line) were used to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of caffeic acid by examining its modulation of NF-κB signaling pathway by LPS. Our results show that LPS-induced oxidative stress-related NF-κB activation upregulated pro-inflammatory COX-2, NF-κB targeting gene which were all inhibited effectively by caffeic acid. Our study shows that caffeic acid inhibits the activation of NF-κB via the c-Src/ERK and NIK/IKK signal transduction pathways. Our results indicate that antioxidative effect of caffeic acid and its restoration of redox balance are responsible for its anti-inflammatory action. Thus, the study provides new information regarding the anti-inflammatory properties of caffeic acid and the roles in the regulation of LPS-induced oxidative stress induces alterations in signal transduction pathways.

Keywords

NF-κB Caffeic acid Oxidative stress NIK/IKK c-Src/ERK LPS 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was carried out with the support of “Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science & Technology Development (Project No. PJ00652213)” Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea. This work was supported by the R&D program of MKE/KEIT (10040391, Development of Functional Food Materials and Device for prevention of Aging-associated Muscle Function Decrease). We also take this opportunity to thank the Aging Tissue Bank (Busan, Korea) for supplying research materials.

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • So Ra Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu Ri Jung
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dae Hyun Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hye Jin An
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mi Kyung Kim
    • 1
  • Nam Deuk Kim
    • 1
  • Hae Young Chung
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Molecular Inflammation Research Center for Aging InterventionPusan National UniversityBusanKorea
  2. 2.College of PharmacyPusan National UniversityBusanKorea

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