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Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 35, Issue 12, pp 2153–2162 | Cite as

High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis for quantitation of marker compounds of Artemisia capillaris thunb.

  • Kyung Min Park
  • Ying Li
  • Bora Kim
  • Haiyan Zhang
  • Kyong Hwangbo
  • Dong Gen Piao
  • Mei Juan Chi
  • Mi-Hee Woo
  • Jae Sue Choi
  • Je-Hyun Lee
  • Dong-Cheul Moon
  • Hyeun Wook Chang
  • Jae-Ryong KimEmail author
  • Jong Keun SonEmail author
Research Article Drug Development

Abstract

Two stable high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods were developed that could quantitatively analyze 10 major marker compounds of Artemisia capillaris Thunb and could also distinguish among ‘Injinho’ and ‘Myeon-injin’ and ‘Haninjin’ — A. capillaris collected in autumn, A. capillaris collected in spring and A. iwayomogi, which can be misused as ‘Injinho’ in Korean herbal drug markets. The first HPLC method was a reversed-phase chromatography using a C18 column with an isocratic solvent system of phosphoric acid (0.05%) and acetonitrile at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, ultraviolet (UV) detection wavelength at 254 nm and column temperature at 40°C. Calibration and quantitation were made by using acetaminophen as an internal standard (I.S-A) and chlorogenic acid (1) was determined within 20 min. The second HPLC method was a reversed-phase chromatography using a C18 column with a gradient solvent system of phosphate buffer (0.015 M, pH 6) and acetonitrile at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, UV detection wavelength at 254 nm and column temperature at 40°C. Calibration and quantitation were made by using ethylparaben as an internal standard (I.S-B) and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 3,4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3), 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4), hyperoside (5), isoquercitrin (6), isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside (7), isorhamnetin-3-O-galactoside (8), isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside (9) and scoparone (10) were determined within 60 min. Pattern recognition analysis of data from the 60 samples classified them clearly into three groups. These assay methods could be applied for QA/QC of A. capillaris and Artemisia iwayomogi.

Key words

Artemisia capillaris Thunb. Chlorogenic acid 3,5-Di-O-caffeoylquinic acid 3,4- Di-O-caffeoylquinic acid Scoparone HPLC 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyung Min Park
    • 1
  • Ying Li
    • 1
  • Bora Kim
    • 1
  • Haiyan Zhang
    • 1
  • Kyong Hwangbo
    • 1
  • Dong Gen Piao
    • 1
  • Mei Juan Chi
    • 1
  • Mi-Hee Woo
    • 2
  • Jae Sue Choi
    • 3
  • Je-Hyun Lee
    • 4
  • Dong-Cheul Moon
    • 5
  • Hyeun Wook Chang
    • 1
  • Jae-Ryong Kim
    • 6
    Email author
  • Jong Keun Son
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.College of PharmacyYeungnam UniversityGyeongsanKorea
  2. 2.College of PharmacyCatholic University of DaeguGyeongsanKorea
  3. 3.Faculty of Food Science and BiotechnologyPukyoung National UniversityBusanKorea
  4. 4.College of Oriental MedicineDongguk UniversityGyeongjuKorea
  5. 5.College of Pharmacy, CBITRCChungbuk National UniversityCheongjuKorea
  6. 6.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of MedicineYeungnam UniversityDaeguKorea

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