BIOspektrum

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 288–290 | Cite as

Biosynthese und Genomik mikrobieller Polysaccharide

  • Jochen Schmid
  • Steven Koenig
  • Broder Rühmann
  • Marius Rütering
  • Volker Sieber
Wissenschaft · Special: Genomics Bakterielle Exopolysaccharide

Abstract

Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) are biogenic and biodegradable polymers. The range of their application is extending steadily and in some areas they are already competing with conventional petrochemical products such as polyacrylates. Despite growing interest in microbial EPS, biosynthesis and production on a molecular scale are still not fully understood. By connecting genomic and structural data, it is possible to gain new insights into EPS biosynthesis. Our aim is to extend the knowledge on enzyme functions and biosynthetic pathways involved in microbial EPS production.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jochen Schmid
    • 1
  • Steven Koenig
    • 1
  • Broder Rühmann
    • 1
  • Marius Rütering
    • 1
  • Volker Sieber
    • 1
  1. 1.Lehrstuhl für Chemie Biogener RohstoffeTU MünchenStraubingGermany

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