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Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 (IL1R1) Levels Are Not Increased in Healthy Centenarians

  • Lourdes Vicent
  • Helena Martínez-Sellés
  • Alejandro Lucia
  • Enzo Emanuele
  • Francisco Fernández-Avilés
  • Manuel Martínez-Sellés
Correspondence

Dear Editor,

Interleukin-1 receptor-like 1 (IL1R1, alias ST2) is a biomarker with increasing applications in cardiology, especially as an indicator of heart failure. This serum biomarker has been shown in acutely decompensated HF to have good diagnostic and prognostic reliability [1]. An increase of IL1R1 is observed in the presence of cardiovascular stress and fibrosis, myocardial remodeling, or hypertrophy.

In asymptomatic individuals in the general population, ST2 elevation was associated with a higher risk of hypertension, diabetes, incident heart failure, and mortality [2]. It has been described that values for IL1R1/ST2 increase with age [3]. However, studies addressing the potential impact of age on IL1R1/ST2 levels have included a relatively young cohort of patients (> 65 years) [2]. In the very old patients, the age-related stiffening of the vasculature may justify by itself an increase in ST2. Our aim was to determine if an increased longevity is inexorably associated with...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

The study protocol complied with the principles of Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the Gregorio Marañon Hospital Ethics Committee.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Research Involving Human Participants

All participants provided informed consent.

References

  1. 1.
    Januzzi, J. L., Mebazaa, A., & Di Somma, S. (2015). ST2 and prognosis in acutely decompensated heart failure: the International ST2 Consensus Panel. The American Journal of Cardiology, 115, 26b–31b.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Ho, J. E., Sritara, P., deFilippi, C. R., & Wang, T. J. (2015). Soluble ST2 testing in the general population. The American Journal of Cardiology, 115, 22b–25b.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Coglianese, E. E., Vasan, R. S., Ho, J. E., Ghorbani, A., McCabe, E. L., Cheng, S., Fradley, M. G., Kretschman, D., Gao, W., O'Connor, G., Wang, T. J., & Januzzi, J. L. (2012). Distribution and clinical correlates of the interleukin receptor family member soluble ST2 in the Framingham Heart Study. Clinical Chemistry, 58, 1673–1681.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Vicent, L., Martínez-Sellés, H., Ariza-Solé, A., Lucia, A., Emanuele, E., Bayés-Genís, A., Fernández-Avilés, F., & Martínez-Sellés, M. (2018). A panel of multibiomarkers of inflammation, fibrosis, and catabolism is normal in healthy centenarians but has high values in young patients with myocardial infarction. Maturitas, 116, 54–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Januzzi, J. L. (2013). ST2 as a cardiovascular risk biomarker: from the bench to the bedside. Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research, 6, 493–500.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lourdes Vicent
    • 1
  • Helena Martínez-Sellés
    • 2
  • Alejandro Lucia
    • 3
  • Enzo Emanuele
    • 4
  • Francisco Fernández-Avilés
    • 1
    • 2
  • Manuel Martínez-Sellés
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Universitario Gregorio MarañónInstituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón. CIBERCVMadridSpain
  2. 2.Universidad ComplutenseMadridSpain
  3. 3.Universidad Europea and Research Institute HospitalMadridSpain
  4. 4.2E ScienceRobbioItaly

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