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Neuroscience Bulletin

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 270–276 | Cite as

Standardized Operational Protocol for Human Brain Banking in China

  • Wenying Qiu
  • Hanlin Zhang
  • Aimin Bao
  • Keqing Zhu
  • Yue Huang
  • Xiaoxin Yan
  • Jing Zhang
  • Chunjiu Zhong
  • Yong Shen
  • Jiangning Zhou
  • Xiaoying Zheng
  • Liwei Zhang
  • Yousheng Shu
  • Beisha Tang
  • Zhenxin Zhang
  • Gang Wang
  • Ren Zhou
  • Bing Sun
  • Changlin Gong
  • Shumin Duan
  • Chao MaEmail author
Perspective

With the progress of society, there is an increasing need to tackle disorders of the central nervous system. Human brain tissue, unlike animal tissues, is an irreplaceable resource for the study of neurological diseases [1]. Aimed at scientific research and education, the roles of human brain tissue repositories are to acquire brain tissue from donors, prepare, process, and preserve collected samples, provide tissue to specific eligible facilities, and determine the characteristics of each tissue sample. The construction of human brain banks is highly valued by neurologists. Related academic achievements have promoted the understanding of the relationship between brain structures and functions, as well as the pathological features, etiology, and pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Meanwhile, human brain banking plays an important role in developing effective methods for preventing and treating these diseases [2].

However, the quantity and scale of brain banks in China have lagged...

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Copyright information

© Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenying Qiu
    • 1
  • Hanlin Zhang
    • 1
  • Aimin Bao
    • 2
  • Keqing Zhu
    • 2
  • Yue Huang
    • 3
  • Xiaoxin Yan
    • 4
  • Jing Zhang
    • 5
  • Chunjiu Zhong
    • 6
  • Yong Shen
    • 7
  • Jiangning Zhou
    • 7
  • Xiaoying Zheng
    • 8
  • Liwei Zhang
    • 9
  • Yousheng Shu
    • 10
  • Beisha Tang
    • 11
  • Zhenxin Zhang
    • 12
  • Gang Wang
    • 13
  • Ren Zhou
    • 14
  • Bing Sun
    • 15
  • Changlin Gong
    • 1
  • Shumin Duan
    • 2
  • Chao Ma
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience CenterChinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of NeurobiologyZhejiang University School of MedicineHangzhouChina
  3. 3.Neurology Center, Beijing Tiantan Hospital Affiliated to Beijing Capital Medical University and Central Brain BankNational Clinical Research Centre for Neurological DisordersBeijingChina
  4. 4.Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology, Xiangya School of MedicineCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  5. 5.Department of PathologyPeking University Health Science CentreBeijingChina
  6. 6.Department of Neurology, Zhongshan HospitalFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  7. 7.School of Life SciencesUniversity of Science and Technology of ChinaHefeiChina
  8. 8.Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Health Science Academy/Institute of Population ResearchPeking UniversityBeijingChina
  9. 9.Beijing Tian Tan HospitalCapital Medical UniversityBeijingChina
  10. 10.Institute of Brain and Cognitive SciencesBeijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina
  11. 11.Xiangya HospitalCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  12. 12.Department of NeurologyPeking Union Medical College HospitalBeijingChina
  13. 13.Department of Neurology and Neuroscience InstituteRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  14. 14.Department of PathologyZhejiang University School of MedicineHangzhouChina
  15. 15.China Brain BankZhejiang University School of MedicineHangzhouChina

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