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Neuroscience Bulletin

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 341–348 | Cite as

Sleep and Cognitive Abnormalities in Acute Minor Thalamic Infarction

  • Wei Wu
  • Linyang Cui
  • Ying Fu
  • Qianqian Tian
  • Lei Liu
  • Xuan Zhang
  • Ning Du
  • Ying Chen
  • Zhijun Qiu
  • Yijun Song
  • Fu-Dong Shi
  • Rong XueEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

In order to characterize sleep and the cognitive patterns in patients with acute minor thalamic infarction (AMTI), we enrolled 27 patients with AMTI and 12 matched healthy individuals. Questionnaires about sleep and cognition as well as polysomnography (PSG) were performed on days 14 and 90 post-stroke. Compared to healthy controls, in patients with AMTI, hyposomnia was more prevalent; sleep architecture was disrupted as indicated by decreased sleep efficiency, increased sleep latency, and decreased non-rapid eye movement sleep stages 2 and 3; more sleep-related breathing disorders occurred; and cognitive functions were worse, especially memory. While sleep apnea and long-delay memory recovered to a large extent in the patients, other sleep and cognitive function deficit often persisted. Patients with AMTI are at an increased risk for hyposomnia, sleep structure disturbance, sleep apnea, and memory deficits. Although these abnormalities improved over time, the slow and incomplete improvement suggest that early management should be considered in these patients.

Keywords

Acute minor thalamic infarction Polysomnography Cognition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Health Industry Key Research Project of Tianjin Municipality, China (12KG132), and the Science and Technology Plan Project of Tianjin Municipality, China (13ZCZDSY01900).

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Copyright information

© Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Wu
    • 1
  • Linyang Cui
    • 1
  • Ying Fu
    • 1
  • Qianqian Tian
    • 1
  • Lei Liu
    • 1
  • Xuan Zhang
    • 1
  • Ning Du
    • 1
  • Ying Chen
    • 1
  • Zhijun Qiu
    • 1
  • Yijun Song
    • 1
  • Fu-Dong Shi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rong Xue
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyTianjin Medical University General HospitalTianjinChina
  2. 2.Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological InstituteSt. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical CenterPhoenixUSA

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