Advertisement

Pathology & Oncology Research

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 691–696 | Cite as

Combined Treatment with Autologous CIK Cells, Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Advanced Cervical Cancer

  • Ning Li
  • Yong-Wei Tian
  • Yue Xu
  • Dan-Dan Meng
  • Ling Gao
  • Wen-jie Shen
  • Zong-lan Liu
  • Zhi-Qiao XuEmail author
Original Article
  • 46 Downloads

Abstract

To investigate the clinical efficacy of autologous cytokine induced killer (CIK) cells transfusion combined with radiochemotherapy in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. A total of 89 hospitalized patients with advanced cervical cancer were admitted and divided into the treatment group (44 cases, autologous CIK cells transfusion combined with radiochemotherapy) and the control group (45 cases, radiochemotherapy) by a randomized non-blind method. Comparisons of therapeutic efficacies, immune functions, life qualities and survival rates were analyzed between the two groups. The short-term therapeutic efficacy of the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group. There was no significant difference in 1, 2 and 3 year survival rates between the two groups. Compared with pre-treatment, levels of CD3+, CD4+/CD8+ in peripheral blood were increased in the CIK group, which were reduced in the control group. In the CIK group,only the feeling was depressed on the 25th day post-treatment (T25) compared with the day before treatment (B1). However in the control group, the function of body, role, social and holistic health was obvious disordered on day T25 compared with day B1. On day T25, there were significant differences in function of body, social and holistic health between two groups. Autologous CIK cells transfusion combined with radiochemotherapy shows better short-term efficacy than radiochemotherapy alone in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, which obviously improves immune function and life quality of patients with low side effects.

Keywords

Autologous CIK cell Advanced cervical cancer Radiochemotherapy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the Science and Technology Research Projects of Kaifeng City.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors report no potential conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Hu Y, Sun X, Mao C, et al (2017) Upregulation of long noncoding RNA TUG1 promotes cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration. Cancer Med 6(2):471–482Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Artan, I.M., et al., The knowledge, attitude and behavioral-intent regarding cervical cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: A cross-sectional study among female university students in Ajman, UAEGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ferlay J et al (2010) Cancer incidence and mortality worldwide: IARC CancerBase no.11. IARC 136(5):E359–E386Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Vidal JP et al (2015) Genetic diversity of HPV16 and HPV18 in Brazilian patients with invasive cervical cancer. J Med Virol 88(7):1279–1287CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Haque W, Verma V, Fakhreddine M, Hatch S, Butler EB, Teh BS (2017) Addition of chemotherapy to definitive radiotherapy for IB1 and IIA1 cervical cancer: analysis of the National Cancer Data Base. Gynecol Oncol 144(1):28–33CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Zheng Y, Hu B, Xie S, Chen X, Hu Y, Chen W, Li S, Hu B (2017) Dendritic cells infected by ad-sh-SOCS1 enhance cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell immunotherapeutic efficacy in cervical cancer models. Cytotherapy 19(5):617–628CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Niam M, Linn YC, Fook Chong S, Lim TJ, Chu S, Choong A, Yong HX, Suck G, Chan M, Koh M (2011) Clinical scale expansion of cytokine-induced killer cells is feasible from healthy donors and patients with acute and chronic myeloid leukemia at various stages of therapy. Exp Hematol 39(9):897–903.e1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Arber C, Abhyankar H, Heslop HE, Brenner MK, Liu H, Dotti G, Savoldo B (2013) The immunogenicity of virus-derived 2A sequences in immunocompetent individuals. Gene Ther 20(9):958–962CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Liu AM et al (2011) Antitumor effects of cytokine- induced killer cells on cervical cancer HeLa cells in vitro and in vivo. Carcino, Terato & Muta 23(5):353–161Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kim HM, Lim J, Kang JS, Park SK, Lee K, Kim JY, Kim YJ, Hong JT, Kim Y, Han SB (2009) Inhibition of human cervical carcinoma growth by cytokine-induced killer cells in nude mouse xenograft model. Int Immunopharmacol 9(3):375–380CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Green JA, Kirwan JM, Tierney JF, Symonds P, Fresco L, Collingwood M, Williams CJ (2001) Survival and recurrence after concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer of the uterine cervix: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet 358(9284):781–786CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zagon IS, Mclaughlin PJ (2012) Targeting opioidergic pathways as a novel biological treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. Expert Rev Gastroent 6(2):133–135CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Mesiano G, Todorovic M, Gammaitoni L, Leuci V, Giraudo Diego L, Carnevale-Schianca F, Fagioli F, Piacibello W, Aglietta M, Sangiolo D (2012) Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells as feasible and effective adoptive immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors. Expert Opin Biol Ther 12(6):673–684CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Jonathan Benjamin M (2013) Early infusion of donor-derived CIK cells as consolidative immunotherapy following non-Myeloablative allogeneic transplantation: safety and feasibility. Blood 122Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Linn YC, Yong HX, Niam M, Lim TJ, Chu S, Choong A, Chuah C, Goh YT, Hwang W, Loh Y, Ng HJ, Suck G, Chan M, Koh M (2012) A phase I/II clinical trial of autologous cytokine-induced killer cells as adjuvant immunotherapy for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia in clinical remission. Cytotherapy 14(7):851–859CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Geng J, Zhang Q, Tong J (2016) Effect of chemoradiation combined with DC-CIK cells biological therapy on the treatment of patients with middle-advanced non-small cell lung cancer. J Clin Med in Prac 20(9):48–50Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Shi L et al (2012) Adjuvant immunotherapy with CIK cells for stage III gastric Cancer. J Basic Clin Onco 25(3):62–65Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Luo X et al (2016) Curative effect of autologous DC-CIK cells on metastatic renal cell carcinoma. J Mod Oncol 15:2426–2429Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Chen B et al (2015) Effectiveness of immune therapy combined with chemotherapy on the immune function and recurrence rate of cervical cancer. Exp Ther Med 9(3):1063–1067CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Arányi Lajos Foundation 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ning Li
    • 1
  • Yong-Wei Tian
    • 1
  • Yue Xu
    • 1
  • Dan-Dan Meng
    • 1
  • Ling Gao
    • 1
  • Wen-jie Shen
    • 2
  • Zong-lan Liu
    • 2
  • Zhi-Qiao Xu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.The Center of Tumor Diagnosis and TreatmentKaifeng Central HospitalKaifengChina
  2. 2.The Department of StatisticsKaifeng Central HospitalKaifengChina

Personalised recommendations